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Huge rats, cats, dogs, birds & live sheep in the food market

New Market

Then after hearing about the history of this shopping mecca, officially built in the 1870s and once housed the most important retailers of the British era, it was free time for a short 2 hours so it was into the bowels of the extensive New Market.

New Market is a market in Kolkata situated on Lindsay Street at Free School Street (Mirza Ghalib Street). Although primarily "New Market" referred to the original enclosed market, today in local parlance, the entire shopping area is often known as "New Market".

Despite the appearance of new air-conditioned, American-style, shopping malls all over Kolkata, New Market, which has survived two devastating fires and regular flooding, remains at the core of the shopping experience in the city. Over 2,000 stalls under its roof sell everything from clothing to wheeled luggage to electronics to a special cheese found nowhere else. Under its apparent chaos lie extraordinary finds as well as remarkable bargains. Newmarket is a place to shop for garments & accessories, flowers, different food items including raw meat, fish, vegetables and fruits and even spices. There are crockeries and utensil stores. It also has a florist section dealing with exotic flowers. It is situated on Lindsay Street, Kolkata (Calcutta), just off Chowringhee Road, the market is open 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. Monday to Friday, until 7 p.m. on Saturdays, and closed on Sundays. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Market,_Kolkata

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Marbles ... a universal kids game around the whole world

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I don't think that this hand pulled rickshaw wallah or puller will be going anywhere fast. Just one of many that I saw around the market.

Kolkata is one of the last bastion of the hand pulled rickshaw. There are still about 18,000 rickshaw pullers and 6,000 rickshaws.

Most rickshaws serve people "just a notch above poor" who tend to travel short distances through the narrow & haphazard lanes that are sometimes inaccessible to even the most daring taxi driver.

Rickshaws transport middle-class residents who use their services out of convenience and for short distance trips to the local marketplace.

A woman with marketing to do can arrive in a rickshaw, have the rickshaw wallah wait until she comes back from various stalls to load her purchases, and then be taken home.

Proprietors of cafés or corner stores send rickshaws to collect their supplies.

They also provide an invaluable service for residents who could not be able to afford a taxi or auto rickshaw.

Some of the rickshaw pullers steadiest customers are middle-class families who will have a contract with a puller to take a child to and from school.

In the thick of monsoon rickshaws keep passengers above the water logged and swim through the flooded streets and lanes.

It is also used by the lane residents as a "24 hour" ambulance service.

Plus they are eco-friendly!

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https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2008/04/kolkata-india-rickshaw-driver-culture/

https://www.indiatimes.com/news/india/kolkata-s-hand-pulled-rickshaws-are-the-last-sketches-of-a-colonial-hangover-in-india-266494.html

Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&biw=1536&bih=734&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=VWqtWoeYDsuE8gXO4KzwDw&q=kolkata+rickshaw+wallah+&oq=kolkata+rickshaw+wallah+&gs_l=psy-ab.12...588088.588088.0.589409.1.1.0.0.0.0.374.374.3-1.1.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.0.0....0.QmV_EThsBkc

The New Market witnessed two major fires on 13 December 1985 and 20 July 2011, another massive fire on 18 May 2015 and again Nov 9, 2017.

The New Market witnessed two major fires on 13 December 1985 and 20 July 2011, another massive fire on 18 May 2015 and again Nov 9, 2017.

It was out the back going through the fish, meat and chicken sections that really interested me as oppose to the usual clothing, material and household ware, craft stalls in the main part of the New Market where the stall keepers kept asking “What do you want to buy?” Ken had mentioned about this part of the market and the locals living at the back as well.

By the time I got there, all but 2 operators had finished for the day. It was like a movie set with the birds all over the chopping blocks and in the rafters. Then the cats and dogs roaming around. Next door in amongst the meat section it was the large rats, more cats, dogs, birds and even live sheep.

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Look up into the rafters

Look up into the rafters

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=kolkata+new+market&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiXjZaaifTZAhVDxbwKHZENDBQQ_AUICigB&biw=1536&bih=734

Back to the hotel to give JD my visa and passport as he needed a copy for entry into Sikkim later in the trip.

Because of the winter fog, the train departure time was brought forward to 5.30pm / 17:30 with the need to leave the hotel at 3.30pm / 15:30 to allow for traffic.

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In the evening boarded the overnight New Jalpaiguri Kamrup Express train to New Jalpaiguri.

Now is my bag there?

Now is my bag there?

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What did I expect? Probably a similar standard of 4 berth A/C cabins to that I had 12 months ago in Vietnam. Yes, it was 4 berths but a lower standard. Curtains replaced doors and there were 2 extra bunks out in the passageway that unfortunately Robyn and Toba got. We were given bunks randomly separated but allocated as males and females.

Yes, it was a basic overnight train with a pillow and blanket but I forgot to bring out of my backpack my sleeping sheet. By luck got what I had wanted … a bottom bunk.

Train slowly pulled out at 5.37pm / 17:37 before picking up speed and soon the rocking motion.

Experienced overnight travel like a local. One of my fellow passengers was a doctor with the Indian railway:

  • 1.4 million - Work for the railways.
  • 5.6 million - When extended to include the families.
  • 3 million - Retired.
  • 10 million = TOTAL.
  • All receive free health care through hospitals and clinics.
  • There are 2,500 doctors.
  • Country divided into 16 zones broken into 54 divisions.
  • Each division with its own hospital with a major zonal hospital with more specialised services.

Remember India has a population of 1.3+ billion.

With the gentle rocking motion sat back, got some well-earned and likely much-needed rest en route to our next stop.

Posted by bruceontour 22:37 Archived in India Tagged market train meat_market Comments (0)

Human Forklifts

Tour: Mesmerizing Markets Tour
Starting time: 2.30 pm
Duration: 3 hours
Starting point: Bank of India
Cost: INR 4000

http://www.calcuttaphototours.com/tour4.php

The afternoon tour focused on the Koley vegetable market. This wholesale market is certainly not on the tourist “must see” trail.

As Manjit said, it is for photographers. Yes, the challenge was working with the different forms of lighting. For me it was really hard. Sunlight streaming in through the roof, fluro and warm white lights as well.

One just had to take time to stand back and soak in the atmosphere first.

Being a wholesale market, the bulk of Kolkata’s vegetable supply from rural West Bengal areas passes through this market before being sold to the smaller markets around Kolkata.

My senses certainly got a good work out ….

Each item had it’s own dedicated section with it’s own unique smell, sights and sounds.

Wet

Wandering around the arteries of the market watching where one puts ones feet as the ground was at times certainly wet, dirty, mucky, slippery and slushy covered with both fresh but more often rotting vegetable leaves …. it just added to the unique atmosphere.

With the narrow alleyways slippery with muck from the rotting vegetables, it was like dodgems at times … dodging the vendors, porters, buyers and sellers and being careful not to slip.

Smell

Imagine the lovely smell or odour that comes from mountains piled high with onions, chilli or garlic and what they emit coupled with at time the smell of both the fresh and rotting greens lying on the ground. It is not for the faint hearted or if one did not have a strong stomach.

Colour

The vendors had their own unique and indigenous way of highlighting their product with light bulbs wrapped in coloured cellophane at times matching the products to enhance what is beneath it.

Blue for the tomatoes, carrots and ginger, green for the peas, red for the onions.

Vendors

Again it was having Manjit nearby and with his long standing rapore the vendors allowed me closer access to them. Because I wasn’t pressured for time, when asking for permission to take their photo often ended up with a friendly banter. Just look at their facial expressions … from the smiles to the smirks.

No doubt the older ones would have had a few stories to tell with their experience, knowledge and wisdom.

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“Turban-wallas“ or Porters

The highlight to me was definitely seeing the “turban-wallas“ or porters at work. A scene that I had not witnessed anywhere else in all the markets around the world that I had been to.

Huge bails of vegetables weighing between 400 - 500 kilograms were man handled into the market by teams of 4 or more men. Team work at the fore.

With their colourful turbans wrapped around their heads to both soften and distribute the weight the bails on their head, they were continually delivering from the trucks and carts parked outside to the wholesalers inside. With the narrow alleyways, no way could a forklift do this. So perhaps they are human forklifts?

The challenge for me was to get as many faces in the camera screen as possible. Not easy at all. Getting all the feet were dead easy. Watching them walk like a caterpillar with to me anyway no audible commands as when to start moving was at times memorising …

Just watch the video.

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Koley vegetable market was certainly a place of thriving non-stop action. Being here in the late afternoon, I know that this activity had been going on since day break and wondered when does it stop? It was certainly organized chaos.

My time with Manjit today was 7,000 rupee / NZ$147.40 / US$108.60 as I had to pay for the minimum of 2 people but it was really worth it as oppose to me just aimlessly wandering around taking photos and not knowing the hidden treasures of the city.

The final part of my Indian adventure begins tonight with the G Adventures group meeting. JD was the CEO for this tour. Just 8 in this group and for once an even number of males and females. Struck out again with being an “odd” male and was roomed with Ken.

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Welcome group dinner was at Kwality Resturant over in Park St. Fish Butter Masala 375 rupees / NZ$7.90 / US$5.80, garlic naan 105 rupees / NZ$2.20 / US$1.60 and Kingfisher 285 rupees / NZ$6.00 / US$4.40. Total tonight 789 rupees / NZ$16.60 / US$12.20 rounded up to 800 rupee / NZ$16.80 / US$12.40.

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Posted by bruceontour 01:54 Archived in India Tagged market vegetables vegetable_market turban-wallas christmas_street_lights Comments (0)

Sassoon Dock

Smelly, noisy with thousands of fish for sale

Sassoon Dock is the main fish loading and trading area in South Mumbai. The Kolis or original inhabitants of Mumbai work here and I knew that they did not like their photos been taken.

Koli people are an ethnic Indian group native to Rajasthan, Himachal Pradesh, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana states. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koli_people

http://www.indiaprofile.com/lifestyle/kolis.htm

The salty whiff of the ocean sea air and the scent of fish greeted me from afar before I could see the Docks.

I’m glad that I got here this early watching where to walk on the wet slippery ground and trying to capture the atmosphere as best I could. Constant noise and this time not from vehicles horns but the traders bidding or calling out what they had to sell. Red snapper, tuna, octopus, baby sharks, cuttlefish, blue crabs and stingray are some of the fish sold here.

Currently about 1,500 trawlers bring in around 20 tonnes of fish every day.

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I’m glad that I got here this early watching where to walk on the wet slippery ground and trying to capture the atmosphere as best I could. Constant noise and this time not from vehicles horns but the traders bidding or calling out what they had to sell.

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Seeing the many women huddled around in a circle taking the prawn shells off the body. Big fingers were not needed for this delicate task.

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I’m glad I came early as when I was leaving around 9am, much of the activity I saw walking in had already finished.

What is the cat after?

What is the cat after?

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Walking back heard this noise and around the corner saw how the big blocks of ice were so quickly machine shaved and then shovelled into plastic crates.

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=sassoon+docks&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiAovuwtOHZAhXFyrwKHcJiAggQ_AUICigB&biw=1536&bih=734

On the airline flight to India I read about the Dock Art Project. I couldn’t obviously find it. (On my return found that I had passed the entrance that was hidden by the fish traders and that it had just closed 30 December.)

This is one of the outside murals painted just for the Dock Art Project.

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&biw=1536&bih=734&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=8o-hWv2dGMj08QX56pSgAg&q=Sasson+dock+art+projects&oq=Sasson+dock+art+projects&gs_l=psy-ab.12...3338.4679.0.8750.7.7.0.0.0.0.213.998.0j3j2.5.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..2.0.0....0.qXNhx52xPYE

Posted by bruceontour 01:42 Archived in India Tagged fishing market mumbai sassoon_docks Comments (0)

Sunrise with the birds

The body must be getting travel wary as I awoke later at 6.45am / 06:45, much later than I had been waking and had to force myself to get out of bed in order to be out and see the sunrise. Last night googled when sunrise was (7.15am) as in my mind I wanted to get the Gateway of India in the picture somehow.

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Taj Mahal Hotel and Taj Mahal Tower

Taj Mahal Hotel and Taj Mahal Tower

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Gateway of India

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Taj Mahal Hotel

Taj Mahal Hotel

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Taj Mahal Hotel and Taj Mahal Tower

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Gateway of India

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Taj Mahal Hotel and Taj Mahal Tower

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On last night’s walkabout I saw chairs and staging being put up in front of the Gateway of India. Now know the reason. A sunrise concert.

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So hung around and eventually saw the sun rise with the sightseeing boats at anchor providing the foreground subject matter. The higher the sun rose, the more orange it became.

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I had read about the Sassoon Dock and googled last night its whereabouts. Google maps said just 22 minutes if walked to get there.

Along the sea wall passing:

  • pigeons and seagulls being fed

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Right opposite the Taj Mahal Hotel

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  • couples getting their photo taken with the sunrise in the background

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  • runners, walkers, people exercising

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  • Colaba sea front boutique hotels

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  • fishermen at work

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  • people living rough sleeping on the pavement.

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Through Colaba early morning vegetable and fruit market. What a contrast one block makes. From the up market expensive hotels to this area where the locals live, shop and work. It had the same atmosphere as the other local markets I have been through.

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Posted by bruceontour 00:16 Archived in India Tagged market sunrise Comments (0)

Street Food Tour

17:30 / 5.30pm
Meeting Point - Churchgate Station
Reality Tours Guide = Nilesh

This is what Reality Tours said …

Get off the eaten path with our delicious tour of Mumbai’s best street food!

Mumbai is famous across India for its outstanding street food but discovering good eateries in a big city is not always easy. Not to worry, that’s where we come in! We’ll help you experience all the flavours the city has to offer by guiding you through Mumbai’s two best street food areas.

We’ll start at Mumbai’s most famous beach, Chowpatty, where we’ll try an array of Mumbai’s best vegetarian street food as we watch the sun set. We’ll have classics such as dahi puri, pani puri and pav bhaji. Then we’ll take a short taxi ride to the lively Mohommad Ali Road area. In this predominantly Muslim neighborhood we’ll introduce you to the local culture and, of course, the delicious food. In the bustling ali khao gaullis (eating lanes) you will find mainly non-vegetarian options such as chota kebabs and chicken tikka.

Hope you’re hungry!

Note: many foods we’ll pass by, and a few items we’ll try in the Mohammed Ali Road area are non-vegetarian. However, there are plenty of options for vegetarians so just please let us know when booking. All snacks at Chowpatty Beach are vegetarian.

http://realitytoursandtravel.com/street-food-tour.php

Chowpatty Beach

It was now 6.30 pm and dinner time. With the sun about to set and a Street Food Tour ahead, no time to watch the sun set, do that tomorrow so let’s start eating.

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Pani Puri

It consists of a round, hollow puri, fried crisp and filled with a mixture of flavored water (commonly known as imli pani), tamarind chutney, chili, chaat masala, potato, onion or chickpeas. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panipuri

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Sev Puri

Although there is no fixed recipe for sev puri, the basic ingredients used widely are the same. Sev puri is essentially made of puri which is loaded with diced potatoes, onions, three types of chutneys: tamarind, chili and garlic and topped with sev. It is seasoned with raw mango, when raw mango is in season or with a hint of lemon and chaat masala. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sevpuri

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Dahi Batat Puri

Sev puri can be made with a variety of fillings and garnishing ingredients. Some popular variations are dahi sev batata puri (sev puri with yogurt and potato), palak sev puri (Sev Puri with spinach) and corn sev puri. Sometimes mint chutney and paneer are also added in its preparation. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sevpuri

The round, hard, puffy puri shell is first broken on top and partially filled with the main stuffing of mashed potatoes or chickpeas. A small amount of haldi powder or chilli powder, or both, may be added for taste, as well as a pinch of salt. Sweet tamarind chutney and spicy green chutney are then poured into the shell, on top of the stuffing. Finally, sweetened beaten yoghurt is generously poured over the shell, and the finished product is garnished with sprinklings of crushed sev, moong dal, pomegranate and finely chopped coriander leaves.

Dahi puri typically comes as 5 or 6 dahi puris per plate. While pani puri is typically served one piece at a time, a plate of many dahi puri is often served together. Each dahi puri is intended to be eaten whole, like pani puri, so that the spectrum of flavors and textures within may all be tasted together. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dahi_puri

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Pav Bhaji

Pav bhaji has many variations in ingredients and garnishes, but is essentially a spiced mixture of mashed vegetables in a thick gravy served hot with a soft white bread roll, usually cooked on a flat griddle (tava).

Variations on pav bhaji include:

  • Cheese pav bhaji, with cheese on top of the bhaji
  • Fried pav bhaji, with the pav tossed in the bhaji
  • Paneer pav bhaji, with paneer cheese in the bhaji
  • Mushroom pav bhaji, with mushrooms in the bhaji
  • Khada pav bhaji, with vegetable chunks in the bhaji
  • Jain pav bhaji, without onions and garlic and with plantains instead of potatoes
  • Kolhapuri pav bhaji, using a spice mix common in Kolhapur
  • White pav bhaji, with no garam masala or no chilli powder.

Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pav_bhaji

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Kulfi

Kulfi has similarities to ice cream in appearance and taste; however it is denser and creamier. It comes in various flavours. The more traditional ones are cream (malai), rose, mango, cardamom (elaichi), saffron (kesar or zafran), and pistachio. There are newer variations such as apple, orange, strawberry, peanut, and avocado. Unlike ice cream, kulfi is not whipped, resulting in a solid, dense frozen dessert similar to traditional custard-based ice cream. Thus, it is sometimes considered a distinct category of frozen dairy-based dessert. Due to its density, kulfi takes a longer time to melt than Western ice cream. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulfi

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Nilesh

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What was my favourite? Yes, when offered I had seconds for most but it was the kulfi and I am not a sweet eater!

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Mohammed Ali Road

Into the taxi and off to the bustling ali khao gaullis (eating lanes) around the Muslim neighbourhood of Dr A V Memon Marg / Mohammed Ansari Taher Rd / Memonwada / Mohammed Ali Road.

I was getting full and didn’t finish the couple of dishes that we had here.

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Top clockwise:
Egg Roti
Onion
Green sauce
Chicken roll
Chicken sandwich

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B U T I still had room for desert!

Taj Ice Cream

How could I not have a second after the Chikoo so it was their Roasted Almond – Chocolate Chips.

But what is Chikoo?

Chikoo, most commonly known as 'Sapota' in India, is a very familiar fruit. Chikoo is also called as Naseberry, Mud Apples, and Sapodilla Plum. Chikoo is a delicate brown fruit which tastes sweet and yummy. Chikoo is scientifically known as 'Sapodilla.' It comes from the Sapotaceae family in Central America.

https://mavcure.com/health-benefits-uses-chikoo-sapodilla-fruit-juice/

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/scoop-bhendi-bazaars-best-kept-secret-is-an-old-ice-cream-shop/articleshow/57352677.cms

https://www.likealocalguide.com/mumbai/the-taj-ice-cream

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Manager

Manager

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Chikoo

Roasted Almond – Chocolate Chips

Roasted Almond – Chocolate Chips

Jalebi

Jalebi, also known as zulbia, is a sweet popular food in countries of South Asia, West Asia, North Africa, and East Africa. It is made by deep-frying maida flour (plain flour or all-purpose flour) batter in pretzel or circular shapes, which are then soaked in sugar syrup. They are particularly popular in Iran and the Indian subcontinent.

The sweets are served warm or cold. They have a somewhat chewy texture with a crystallized sugary exterior coating. Citric acid or lime juice is sometimes added to the syrup, as well as rose water. Jalebi is eaten with curd or rabri (North India) along with optional other flavours such as kewra (scented water). Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jalebi

It was said that the sugary, bright orange jalebi is the national sweet of India. Sorry ... not for me. I would prefer the ice cream or kulfi.

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So that was it ... I was full (of food) … A really busy day seeing and experiencing so much. My senses: taste buds, smells, sound and sights were working overtime today.

12 hours from taking my first to last photo / video today and time to head back to the hotel. Took these photos of the CSMT railway station from the taxi while waiting at the traffic lights.

BTW – About 435 images taken today or one click every 1.65 minutes. Yes, my shutter finger had a busy day.

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Posted by bruceontour 23:58 Archived in India Tagged market Comments (0)

Gold - Zaveri Bazaar

Next it was passing Zaveri Bazaar with its jewellery shops.

Zaveri Bazaar is a jewellery market and a major hub for B2B jewellery industry in Mumbai, India. Located at Bhuleshwar in South Mumbai, just north of Crawford Market, Zaveri Bazaar is a muddle of narrow lanes, dotted with hundreds of jewelry shops that sell gems and jewels, notably Tribhovandas Bhimji Zaveri (TBZ), Dwarkadas Chandumal, Dhirajlal Bhimji Zaveri & UTZ. 65% of all gold trading and dealing in India is estimated to originate from the market. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zaveri_Bazaar

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=zaveri+bazaar&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjAheDk_dXZAhVKp5QKHfeeB64Q_AUICigB&biw=1550&bih=738&dpr=1.25

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Tribhovandas Bhimji Zaveri Ltd. (TBZ) is a noted Indian jeweller and jewellery retail chain based in India. Established in 1864 (153 years ago) by Tribhovandas Bhimji Zaveri in Zaveri Bazaar, the jewellery district of Mumbai, it was subsequently headed by his son, Gopaldas Tribhovandas Zaveri, and now Shrikant Zaveri, is the present chairman and managing director of the group. The company today, has 31 showrooms in 23 cities across eleven states, including Mumbai, Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata and Rajkot.

The company has 30 showrooms under "Tribhovandas Bhimji Zaveri" brand for gold jewellery and diamond studded jewellery. Apart from that it has two designer boutiques under "Krsala", where its sells jadau and diamond-studded jewellery. Its main showroom at Zaveri Bazaar in Mumbai is built across five floors and said to be the largest jewellery showroom in India. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tribhovandas_Bhimji_Zaveri

Mumba Devi Temple

Mumba Devi Temple is a renowned ancient temple dedicated to 'Goddess Mumbadevi'. This beautiful temple situated in Mumbai was built in the 18th century.

The 'Koli' fishermen or the early inhabitants of Mumbai greatly respect and honor Goddess Mumbadevi and consider her as their guardian. Goddess Mumbadevi is recognized as 'Goddess Shakti' or the Goddess of Power.

Today, this elegant temple is sited amidst the crowded steel and cloth markets of Mumbai.

Within the jam-packed Zaveri Bazaar, one can see the Mumba Devi Temple surrounded by several flower shops.

People attend the 'aartis' in this temple that are conducted in the mornings and evenings. The Mumba Devi Temple is open on all days except Mondays. Apart from the regular devotees who flock the temple, tourists from all over the world too, come to admire this gorgeous temple in Mumbai. Mumbai city derives its name from the Goddess Mumbadevi and therefore, this temple is truly an important structure for the dwellers of this beautiful city.

https://www.mumbai.org.uk/religious-places/mumba-devi-temple.html

Hindu priests were bestowing blessings called prasad upon their devotees.

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No photos inside.

Here are some images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=Mumbadevi+Temple&tbm=isch&gws_rd=ssl

Flower Alley

Down a small side lane off Maruti Lane that would be so easy to miss where flowers like saffron-coloured marigolds and red rose garlands have been sold for nearly 100 years.

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Bombay Panjrapole

If you aren’t looking for it, you’d probably miss it. Tucked somewhere in the by-lanes of the crowded Bhuleshwar bazaar is the Bombay Panjrapole, a 176-year-old infirmary that primarily looks after 350 cows and other stray animals like donkeys, hens, birds, dogs, goats, parrots and ducks. The shelter, painted bright blue, spreads across a sprawling two acres within the congested market; it is airy and calm. The only sounds you hear are those of fluttering pigeons at the courtyard kabutarkhana, or cows mooing in the sheds.

http://www.bombaypanjrapole.org.in

To increase their karma, local people shelter and feed the cows, considered sacred to Hindus.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/bombay-panjrapole-cow-shelter-mumbai-3914775

Inside it was really peaceful. In fact it felt more like being in the country rather than in the middle of one of the most crowded cities in India.

It was no photos inside Bombay Panjrapole.

Here are some images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=Bombay+Panjrapole&tbm=isch

and

http://www.bombaypanjrapole.org.in/gallery/

Madhavbaug Temple

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=madhavbaug+temple+mumbai&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwijxIq7jtfZAhULvLwKHb1mC5oQ_AUICygC&biw=1551&bih=744&dpr=1.25

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By now I was running late for my next tour but was handed over to the next guide.

Link to some other market tours:

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-mumbai-markets-1539691

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/mumbai/activities/south-mumbai-walking-tour-markets-and-temples/a/pa-act/v-6283BOMMARKET/356405

Posted by bruceontour 23:31 Archived in India Tagged market Comments (0)

Cloth by the kilometre - Mangaldas Market

Opposite Crawford Market was Mangaldas Market and Mulji Jetha Market (also known as M.J. Market).

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If locals or India’s famous fashion designers were looking to buy cloth by the meter / yard or un-stitched dress material to make Indian outfits or costumes, this is where they would come for either every day or special occasions such as weddings and festivals.

Rows after rows of stalls were filled to the brim with a diverse assortment of colourful fabrics, from bling to block prints!

These sprawling wholesale markets are among the largest textile markets in Asia and we went through only a small part of it.

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=Mangaldas+Market+and+Mulji+Jetha+Market&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjesNypsNfZAhUHvbwKHW7gD1UQ_AUICygC&biw=1536&bih=734

Posted by bruceontour 23:12 Archived in India Tagged market Comments (1)

Where can I find a car horn? Chor Bazaar ~ Thieves Market

'Chor Bazaar, located near Bhendi Bazaar in South Mumbainear place in kamathipura', is one of the largest flea markets in India. The area is one of the tourist attractions of Mumbai. The word chor means thief in Marathi and Hindi. The market is thought to have originally been called Shor Bazaar, meaning noisy market. The current name is said to have come from a British mispronunciation of its original name of Shor Bazaar, "noisy market". Eventually however, stolen goods started finding their way into the market, resulting in it living up to its new name. According to popular legend, if you lose anything in Mumbai you can buy it back from the "Chor Bazaar".

In spite of this reputation, Chor Bazaar is said to sell mostly second-hand goods rather than stolen goods. The market is now famous for antique and vintage items. A store called Mini Market offers old Bollywood posters for sale. Others offer authentic Victorian furniture, replacement parts for automobiles, etc. Although bargains are sometimes staggering, haggling is considered mandatory. This is basically an "organized" flea market, where one has to rummage through junk to find what one wants.

A popular story about the origin of the name of the market is that a violin and some other belongings of Queen Victoria went missing while being unloaded from her ship while on a visit to Bombay, and were later found for sale in the "thieves' market". Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chor_Bazaar

https://www.tripsavvy.com/mumbai-chor-bazaar-1539688

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Which car horn do I want?

Which car horn do I want?

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=chor+bazaar+thieves+market+mumbai&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi77OeCmdLZAhXEpZQKHRvrC1MQ_AUICigB&biw=1536&bih=734

It was as expected crowded, bustling and went on for block after block.

Goods are moved through the streets on the long 2 wheel trolleys with often several guys manoeuvring the long load trying not to hit anyone or vehicles at that.

Back into a taxi and next stop opposite the Churchgate Railway Station.

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Posted by bruceontour 14:15 Archived in India Tagged market Comments (0)

Sweating it out for the next 16 hours

Or how does one spend New Year's Eve?

Day 10 Puducherry > Madurai

Hot Breads for breakfast and I knew exactly what I wanted - the omelette breakfast combo for 120 rupees / NZ$2.50 / US$1.85. That plus some lunch food came to 419 rupees / NZ$8.90 / US$6.50.

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The hour breakfast stop was enough. Leaving Pondy and its French influence, time to hit the road westward for the inland trip to Madurai, one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.

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Cattle Market

Along the way stopped for a very short 15 minutes at the village market near rural Madapattu where to me the cattle being auctioned was the feature. Loved to have spent longer here but then was it because it is a market or was it to better understand the cattle auctioning process?

One had to be careful where one placed ones foot as on re-boarding the bus several had &*#! in their soles. How the locals chucked at the efforts in removing the sh*t. With so much cattle around, what do you expect? I was lucky.

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Me next?

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Onwards towards Hotel Kannappa for a lunch break. Egg biriyani 145 rupees / NZ$3.00 / US$2.20 plus masala tea 30 rupees / NZ$0.60 / US$0.50.

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Passing more fields harvested with rice, villages with their open air butcher shops, vegetables and fish markets we made it to Madurai.

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Gandhi Museum

Stop at the Gandhi Museum and while we’re had nearly an hour here. Sad to say it wasn’t of interest to me.

Gandhi Memorial Museum, established in 1959, is a memorial museum for Gandhi located in the city of Madurai in Tamil Nadu, India. Known asGandhi Museum, it is now one of the five Gandhi Sanghralayas (Gandhi Museums) in the country. It includes a part of the blood-stained garment worn by Gandhi when he was assassinated by Nathuram Godse. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gandhi_Memorial_Museum,_Madurai

http://gandhimuseum.org/site/gandian-institute/national/gandhi-museum-madhurai/

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/madurai/attractions/gandhi-memorial-museum/a/poi-sig/1155208/356498

http://www.mkgandhi.org/gandhiyatra/madurai.htm

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I suspect that I was coming down with something as after we had checked into our hotel Star Residency and I had got some water and Sprite for the mini fridge, it was into bed sweating it out for the next 16 hours. (A couple of Panadol seem to fix this the next morning.)

Some much for seeing in New Year. The 6th roof top celebrations music and midnight fireworks could easily be heard on our 5th floor.

Posted by bruceontour 23:46 Archived in India Tagged market gandhi Comments (0)

Devaraja Market

Day 7 Mysore > Chennai > Māmallapuram

Despite the constant sounds of the vehicles horns performing like an orchestra outside along a major road, breakfast was enjoyed under the pavilion in the open air of the Green Hotel grounds.

While breakfast at 395 rupees / NZ$8.30 / US$6.10 cost twice that I could have had back at the hotel where we were staying, nothing beats this hotel setting and it's colonial atmosphere. I could well imagine how the gentry would have been served their g&t out sitting on the green lawn in the midst of this bustling city.

http://www.greenhotelindia.com/

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Walking back hearing the sound of saxophone being played in the middle of a local park near place called Rythmn and Blues. Wonder if there is a connection?

Devaraja Market

Local bus to the Devaraja Market.

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Pomegranate

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Pomegranate

Pomegranate

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Only an hour was allowed here and yes, I could have certainly spent more time here talking to the store keepers and asking if they wouldn't mind their picture being taken. Two quick photos - head and shoulder plus one showing what they were selling. Some wanted their photo sent to them.

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A real young salesman ... he will go far. Pity I had no need to buy any of his paints.

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180 rupees for the imported American apples

140 rupees for the local Indian ones

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50 rupees for the garland of flowers - will be taken to the temple

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Was asked if I wanted to see how incense is hand rolled. Yes, then the "hook" with the perfume sampling and "you want to buy" routine.

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Puffed rice - paper rice

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Sugar cane ... looks like soap

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Mouse / rat (rodent) trap

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Banana leaf

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While I have been through many local markets around the world, this one fascinated me with the colour and fragrance of the guys and girls making the flower garlands. It was pointed out that my requested posed photos of store keepers are of males. Need to work on getting the gender balance right.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/mysuru-mysore/attractions/devaraja-market/a/poi-sig/1293025/356332

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Local bus 266 back, "Whats app" call to brother Tim and 30 minutes was enough time to head to the neighbouring food court for a cold press orange and lime juice at This and That for 120 rupees / NZ$2.50 / US$1.85 that took far too long to make. Perhaps they had to pick the fruit.

Jalandhar Express train

Tuk tuk to the railway station.

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Recharging their mobile phones

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Fifteen minutes late in leaving at 2.40pm / 14:40. The Jalandhar Express train ride to Chennai on the east coast aboard Indian's vast rail system soon quickly past.

Met fellow passengers and let the landscapes soak in with a bright orange sunset before night darkness quickly descended.

Pre-dinner drinks served meaning was given a 1 litre bottle of water and 250ml tetra pack of juice.

Dinner service started at 6pm with a tray of Indian snacks and finished with a tub of ice cream served after 9pm.

In between was a couple of bread sticks and butter, soup, tea or coffee before served the main meal of rice, Dahl and a vegetarian container plus yoghurt curd. Yes, the railway crew certainly stretched out the meal service and why not.

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End of the line when the train pulled in to Chennai Central just after 10pm / 22:00.

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A 90 minute bus ride to the Māmallapuram got us there around midnight.

Posted by bruceontour 16:59 Archived in India Tagged market train Comments (0)

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