A Travellerspoint blog

By this Author: bruceontour

62 ~ Summary - Reflections

Third trip to India?


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Will I do a third trip to India?

Probably “Yes” as there is so much more of this incredible country to see.

At least on this trip no Delhi belly or unknown physical muscular issues like last time ...

Just didn't take my heel balm and was wearing most of the time my slip-on Birkenstock with no socks plus it was dry and at times dusty ... hence cracked heals.

Yes, should have worn my orthopaedics inserts for my shoes more than I did as that was also an issue towards the end of the trip ... walking towards the end of the day and the impact on the soles of both my heels.

Yes, there were lots of surprises and differences to my previous India trip a year ago.

What would I remember of this trip?

Travelling by car seeing:

  • Yellow fields of mustard.
  • Overloaded vehicles carrying hay.
  • Dead animals mainly dogs on both the side of the road and road itself.
  • The noise, particularly the horns in the towns and cities

When walking:

  • The street photography and willingness by mainly the shop keepers for their photo to be taken. So it was a quick 2 shots - one setting the scene of what they were selling, then a heads and shoulder.
  • The ladies and families who asked me to take their photos taken.
  • The old men who have lived a lifetime seeing the India that they grew up with changed - no doubt full of wisdom.
  • The ladies often dressed in a red sari with veils covering their faces.

Weather:

While it was winter, it was nice for me. Yes, the mornings were cold with the need to wear a long sleeve merino top but it quickly warmed up so soon I was down to just my yellow polo shirt.

“Your Vacations” the local provider:

The local guides and the wide range and standard of service offered.

From Push in Jaipur, Javed in Bikaner plus Prem in Jaisamler who all knew what I was after with my street photography and that I didn’t want to know too much of the history which I had read beforehand.

I didn’t come to India to relax in a hotel - came to see the locals at work and play.

Despite telling my local guide that I am not buying on this trip, being taken to the craft shops and at times pressured to buy! But that’s India so no surprises on this front.

Thanks for the upgraded vehicle with wifi.

Despite discussing the law of the land that talking on the phone when driving was illegal, too often Ashok had long conversation while driving so it was interesting when he changed gear on the manual car … he was not handsfree. Must have had a third hand to hold the steering wheel.

With one’s own vehicle, I able to stop at will like seeing the procession after leaving Luni on route to Ranakpur Temples and the mainly goat market seen enroute to Fatehpur Sikri.

Next time I will need to:
- be much clearer as to my needs and what I want to achieve with the local guides.

- try and ascertain the time that was allowed seeing the local sights.

Weather:

No rain despite reading back home the wet summer’s weather that they were experiencing.

Accommodation:

Had a diverse range of accommodation ... from the Heritage hotels to a resort with the odd 3 and 4 star hotel thrown in for good measure.

Great staying at the heritage hotels, all so different and each had its own unique character. Well worth it even though some of them were so far out of town.

  • Hans Plaza - 4 Star hotel in central Delhi so it was good to be able to walk to Connaught Place only a couple of blocks away.
  • Udai Vilas Palace - Out of Mandawa, it felt strange being one of the few guests in this complex.
  • Gajner Palace - A Heritage Hotel in Gajner out of Bikaner. The best room as it felt like an apartment. Plus the 2 hot water bottles as a surprise treat.
  • Fort Rajwada - Best 4 star hotel in in Jaisalmer with its setting. By far had the best buffet breakfast and dinner.
  • Fort Khejerla - Another Heritage Hotel where the village walk around Khejerla was probably the highlight for me and the contact with the locals are concerned.
  • Fort Chanwa - Another Heritage Hotel in Luni.
  • The Lavitra - A 3 star hotel Udaipur. At least it was within easy walking distance back into the old city.
  • Deogarh Mahal - The Heritage Hotel in Deogarh up on the hill with the labyrinth of passageways and roof terraces with its many different levels looking down at Deogarh itself.
  • Ananta Spa Resort - No time for a spa or enjoy this modern complex just out of Pushkar.
  • Fortune Metropolitan - 4 star hotel in Jaipur. The room with the view down into the neighbouring shopping centre from one’s bedroom window.
  • Hotel Amar - 3-star hotel in Agra whose only thing in its favour was that it was just 15 minutes walking distance to the Taj or else why stay here? Wasn’t the food nor the rather dated room. Was only for a night so served its purpose fine.

Generally overnight accomodation was merely to sleep in a clean comfortable bed as oppose to spend time there enjoying the facilities.

Food:

While I am not a fan of Indian food, it was more than fine for me. I was going to go be vegetarian throughout this trip but that didn’t last long.

Jerra rice as well as garlic naan bread quickly become a favourite of mine on this trip.

Sights:

Where do I start?

Yes, as expected the Taj Mahal was no 1, especially seeing it in the morning with the fog coming and going.

Each of the forts had its own characteristics and none stood out as my favourite. Each had their own charm. Would I go back again to see them ... yes, but take it a bit slower and absorb their features and historical significance of its location.

Then there was the havelis and wondering what it would have been like in their hey day.

What about the sunsets and time out in the Sam sand dunes out of Jaisalmer?

Glad that I crammed in so much in the 16 days and managed to see besides the usual Delhi, Agra, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jodhpur that most tours go to, got to Jaisalmer, Pushkar, Mandawa and Bikaner as well.

Hope that you have enjoyed this blog ... watch this space for my next adventure somewhere around our small world of ours.

While my bucket list is getting longer and longer, already planning my next trip to a country that I have not been to yet but don’t know when I will go or if in fact that it will be my next destination.

Posted by bruceontour 02:14 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

61 ~ Home


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Breakfast decided on the Dim sum selection – shrimp fun gor, asparagus dumpling, spinach siu mai and glutinous rice dumpling.

b7a9d7f0-58bf-11e9-8b41-0355b3a0bd58.JPG 29ca1c60-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

Sun rises just north of New Zealand.

Not often when I come back to New Zealand fly down this side of the North Island so close to the coastline ...

9c450e80-58bf-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Cape Reinga & North Cape

9d083770-58bf-11e9-b3fc-07f5aa5ad8a0.JPG

Karikari Peninsula

9c2cf2a0-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG 9abe9590-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

Kaipara Harbour

9a4287c0-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

North Head & Hobson Bay

9a7a3990-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

Kohimarama Beach

9c66c750-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

Point England & Glendowie

9a0bc050-58bf-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Waiheke Island

9cf0dee0-58bf-11e9-b231-ef9a29c8d8f5.JPG 9dde4c20-58bf-11e9-b231-ef9a29c8d8f5.JPG 9da75da0-58bf-11e9-b3fc-07f5aa5ad8a0.JPG

Flat Bush & Clover Park

9e973be0-58bf-11e9-8b41-0355b3a0bd58.JPG

Vector Wero Whitewater Park & Rainbow's End

9df41e10-58bf-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Manukau City

9df46c30-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

Wiri

9cd8c300-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

Wiri

Touchdown.

No issues with going through the "green" lane and getting my bag x rayed.

Home ... wash clothes ... lawns ... ah, back to reality.

Posted by bruceontour 00:12 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

60 ~ Hong Kong

Day 17 : Getting through both immigration & security was so quick


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Hong Kong – A short 9 hour layover and in my head I knew what I would love to achieve:

- If fine go up to the Peak and the new observation Sky Terrace 428 to see down over Hong Kong's Victoria Harbor again. I knew that it didn’t open till 10am / 10:00.

- Take the Star ferry across to Tsim Sha Tsui.

- Go to Wan Chai where Aunty Eileen and Uncle Kwong who was the minister at the Methodist Church and I had stayed all those decades ago plus see the development in that area.

With the skies still dark Hong Kong airport loomed and we arrived at 6.15am / 06:15.

Thanks to Chris’s Octopus card which still had some dollars on it so at the Express Train counter topped it up with another HK$100 NZ$18.90 / US$12.70 / for a return same day trip into town.

Slowly the sky brightened during the short 24 minutes that it took the train to get into Hong Kong station.

Hong Kong was still asleep and just awakening.

Then following my nose and signs to the wharf at Central to catch the Star ferry across Victoria Harbour to Tsim Sha Tsui.

Using the Octopus card HKD$3.70 HK$78 / NZ$0.70 / US$0.50, it was a short 10 minute ride on the upper deck. Yes, there are quicker ways to cross the harbour but it was the magic of the ocean water in amongst the tall skyscrapers and after spending 2 weeks inland in desert like conditions enjoyed the sea air …

821e83b0-58ba-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 83fda3f0-58ba-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

84dda3b0-58ba-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG 8530a5b0-58ba-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

834bb910-58ba-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 9d3fed70-58b8-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

824e6d50-58ba-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 85347640-58ba-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

8455d610-58ba-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

Had the Tsim Sha Tsui side changed as I approached it? No, not really. Just many new buildings across on Hong Kong Island.

I allowed myself just 30 short minutes on this side walking along Kowloon Public Pier passing Hong Kong Cultural Centre and Hong Kong Museum of Art.

82f311c0-58ba-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 83eb2d60-58ba-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

large_84868300-58ba-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

842c5510-58ba-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Going as far as Salisbury Garden as the Avenue of Stars was closed for renovations.

Then back along the street passing the famous The Peninsula (hotel) and finally the iconic former Kowloon – Canton Railway Clock Tower.

854454c0-58ba-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

849b91a0-58ba-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

So, it was back on ferry at 8.30am / 08:30 and this time on the cheaper HKD$2.50 / NZ$0.50 / US$0.30 lower deck across to Central. Much better experience being closer to the water level. Plus it had the locals on their way to work.

15c918a0-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

13317dd0-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG 1320b4f0-58bb-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

13e64ee0-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

IMG_7014.JPG

I knew approximately where the Garden Road Peak Tram lower terminal was so again following my nose going through the elevated walkways between the various buildings got to St John’s Cathedral at 9am / 09:00. The Peak Tram terminal was around the corner.

12c54e80-58bb-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 148993c0-58bb-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.jpeg

147373b0-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

161033c0-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.jpeg

14b29f90-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

16cf6510-58bb-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

17eeb7c0-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

1777da10-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

16a743a0-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG

16f22f50-58bb-11e9-86f7-0f80c5f2c430.JPG 17da9380-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

16fed980-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

A tram was about to leave, but the Sky Terrace 428 viewing terrace didn’t open till 10am / 10:00. I was glad that I brought my HK$99 / NZ$18.70 / US$12.60 ticket for the Peak Tram ride. It takes only 7- 8 minutes each way conquering about 370-meter / 1,300 feet height differences along the 1.35km / 0.8 mile route. It is so steep that the buildings you pass look like they are leaning a gradient of between 4 to 27 degrees!

Meanwhile buses need at least one hour along the winding hill roads. With the tram taking 120 pax = 95 seated and 25 standing, there were plenty of seats to choose from.

Knew to sit on the right-hand side going up for the views.

It was 9.30am / 09:30 when I got as far up as I could in the Sky Terrace 428 building, but it was still 30 minutes before the Sky Terrace 428 roof top opened. Spent time walking along to the Lion Pavilion and then further along Findlay Rd getting a slightly different perspective of the city scene below me.

e25e99d0-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

e36163d0-58bb-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

e4429c10-58bb-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG e4171f40-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

e4059310-58bb-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

IMG_7028.JPG

large_IMG_7027.JPG

large_e2e8b160-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

e1f4b470-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

e1799100-58bb-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

Sky Terrace 428 is guess what, 428 metres above sea level and is the highest viewing platform in Hong Kong offering a stunning 360-degree panoramic view across the Hong Kong.

https://www.thepeak.com.hk/en/the-peak-experience/the-sky-terrace-428

https://www.thepeak.com.hk/en (tram)

a32c34b0-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

a2b975b0-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Being one of the first to get up to the Sky Terrace 428 was good as there was hardly anyone on the viewing platform. With free wi-fi did a Facebook Live sending New Year’s greetings. Yes, Hong Kong has as expected changed and is still growing “upwards”.

a47619d0-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

a2344020-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

a1ac9990-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

a4eb22c0-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG a526f340-58bc-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

a59ee260-58bc-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG a562c3c0-58bc-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

large_a3eec160-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

a6b88fc0-58bc-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG a5e428c0-58bc-11e9-abb1-3f01358d2d8b.JPG

a4adf2b0-58bc-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Then down and it was only 10.45am / 10:45 but what a long queue was now waiting to get their tickets. So glad that I went up early!

cff27f30-58bd-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG d0aeca50-58bd-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

d135ad90-58bd-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG d14b3160-58bd-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

d0c40000-58bd-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG d0ce8750-58bd-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

d1333c90-58bd-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

Hennessy Rd with Methodist House and the Chinese Methodist Church was only a short 15-minute walk away along Queensway.

feef9c50-58bd-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

While the trams are still there, gone is the “ding, ding” that I vividly remember the sound trams made when staying with Aunty Eileen and Uncle Kwong above the church.

Henry showed me around the redeveloped site and chapel. Just the facade of the building was kept and a 28-story office block built 1997/98.

fe976a30-58bd-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG IMG_7053.JPG

ffc3b530-58bd-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

00b715e0-58be-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG 004ae690-58be-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

IMG_7059.JPG

IMG_7058.JPG

Time for some lunch but with my spoken Cantonese now virtually non-existent and I can’t read Chinese, it was interesting wandering around the back streets of Wan Chai trying to find a local place to eat at.

Found Wong Kei Chinese Barbecue Restaurant = Suckling Pig with Rice HK$72 plus the soup HK$6 = HK$78 / NZ$14.70 / US$9.90.

fe3af250-58bd-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

fe2aecc0-58bd-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG fe633ad0-58bd-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

fdf9caa0-58bd-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre down by the harbour. With MTR expansion construction passing the Central Government offices and Legislative Council Complex.

5b201310-58be-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

5ebd8520-58be-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

5cd53d20-58be-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

IMG_7064.JPG

Down through Tamar Park with “both” flags flying.

59bbef30-58be-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

5e245260-58be-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG 5e9f27b0-58be-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

Along the Central and Eastern District Promenade to the Central Harbourfront event space and neighbouring AIA Carnival with the Hong Kong Observation Wheel.

5a3787d0-58be-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

5aa71280-58be-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

5a448020-58be-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

5bd4bd10-58be-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

5d438f50-58be-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

5b6b73f0-58be-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

5db42b70-58be-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

5ce2aaa0-58be-11e9-a112-8b61870ef97c.JPG

Now 12.45pm / 12:45 so time to think about heading back to the airport. I had allowed 2 hours to get back and that included getting through immigration / security etc.

In fact, I had plenty of time as the Express train left soon after I arrived at the platform. Getting through both immigration and security was so quick. So, had time to pass before my 3.20pm / 15:20 departure. By now I knew that Premium Economy passengers had their own queue at the boarding gate.

2a55ba90-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

Yes, I should have added all these videos below together as 1 continuous clip ...

It was a night flight, dinner then managed to get some sleep.

2a21d950-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG fdf6ef00-58be-11e9-9440-8b7d0b3aee4f.JPG

29ca1c60-58bf-11e9-ae3a-55b248a6fd35.JPG

2a1dbaa0-58bf-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

2a721c30-58bf-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 02:23 Archived in Hong Kong Tagged star_ferry tsim_sha_tsui sky_terrace_428 Comments (0)

59 ~ Taj Mahal's back side : Mehtab Bagh

Gardens are not in their full glory - great to visit February through to April


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

I wanted to see the Taj Mahal (Taj) from the “rear” and the Mughal Riverfront Gardens was being the restored including the Mehtab Bagh.

Mehtab Bagh (Hindi मेहताब बाग़, Urdu:مہتاب باغ‬‎, translation: Moonlight Garden) is a charbagh complex. It lies north of the Taj Mahal complex and the Agra Fort on the opposite side of the Yamuna River, in the flood plains. The garden complex, square in shape, measures about 300 by 300 metres (980ft × 980ft) and is perfectly aligned with the Taj Mahal on the opposite bank.

Some 81 plants adopted in Mughal horticulture were planted, including guava, maulshri, Nerium, hibiscus, citrus fruit plants, neem, bauhinia, ashokaand jamun. The herbage was planted in such a way that tall trees follow the short ones, then shrubs, and lastly flowering plants. Some of these plants produce bright-coloured flowers that shine in the moonlight. Thanks Mr Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mehtab_Bagh

This is what Lonely Planet has to say …

This park, originally built by Emperor Babur as the last in a series of 11 parks on the Yamuna’s east bank (long before the Taj was conceived), fell into disrepair until it was little more than a huge mound of sand. To protect the Taj from the erosive effects of the sand blown across the river, the park was reconstructed and is now one the best places from which to view the great mausoleum.

The gardens in the Taj are perfectly aligned with the ones here, and the view of the Taj from the fountain directly in front of the entrance gate is a classic. It's a popular spot at sunset.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/agra/attractions/mehtab-bagh/a/poi-sig/1151574/356509

It has great view of the rear of the Taj Mahal with all four towers or minars visible. Unfortunately, there was a lot of mist which had obscured most of the Taj but one could clearly only see the outline. However with the repair works going on, the gardens are not in their full glory. The money shot is no doubt from the fountain which was fenced off being renovated.

Mehtab Bagh is where Shah Jahan intended to build his own mausoleum, a black version, right opposite that of his beloved wife Mumtaz, the Taj Mahal. The jury's out if he ever began work because his son locked him up for the rest of his 44 years to stop him spending so much money. Also, he's said to have blinded and removed the hands of the Taj workmen, so they might never make anything so beautiful again.

Paid the extra 300 rupees / NZ$6.30 / US$4.20. Plus GST came to 505 rupees / NZ$10.50 / US$7.10 for the entrance fee.

08fe0c70-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG 0d10ae80-58b6-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

0897d090-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

0bb82360-58b6-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

IMG_6936.JPG

10a0b310-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

0a64c860-58b6-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 09ce06a0-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

0fb19820-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

IMG_6940.JPG

09fabbf0-58b6-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 08448070-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

0e357f70-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG 10577510-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

0e9d6900-58b6-11e9-b6f0-473e6a6d2724.JPG 0b19c080-58b6-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

0e0bd760-58b6-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

0ab30f70-58b6-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 0e34bc20-58b6-11e9-b6f0-473e6a6d2724.JPG

0f4a4ad0-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG 0d0e1670-58b6-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

0dd70bc0-58b6-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

Was it worth it? Not really but I have no regrets. I can see why this park is popular at nights with the locals and once further developed it would be an even better asset. Would be great to visit this garden in February through to April for the flowers.

If I had more time would have stopped near the field where the locals were playing cricket and used the Taj as a background image.

With a 1.30pm / 13:30 late check out, it was time to head back to the hotel and shower as I have 2 night flights ahead of me, then onto Delhi.

As we drove from Mehtab Bagh back towards the hotel.

0db3f360-58b6-11e9-b6f0-473e6a6d2724.JPG

Seeing a while ago Frances my niece’s photos of her time at the Taj recognised that as we drove to Mehtab Bagh the saris drying laid out on the river bank having been washed. So, it was a very quick stop at the middle and end of the bridge while I dashed out to take a few quick images. Again wish that I had more time to go down to the river level itself. Perhaps next time if there is a next time. That plus see the “Baby” Taj which again is not far away.

75b9a170-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG 73d7c210-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

74993d50-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG 75e3e5c0-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

77764590-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG 78896340-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

IMG_6966.JPG 7a319500-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

7a517910-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

774f3590-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG 7914da60-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

793840e0-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG 79859d90-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

745b49f0-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG IMG_6974.JPG

d8a08a10-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG d91ac320-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

d77d8de0-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Because of the possible traffic delays allowed plenty of time just in case. Hate to miss my flight connection to from Delhi Airport and a 10.30pm / 22:30 flight to Hong Kong.

Taking the Yamuna 6 lane 165 kms / 100 mile expressway from Agra to Greater Noida, it was a quick 3.5 hour journey to travel to the airport.

d93cf120-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG da9973e0-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

However, reaching the outskirt of Delhi, yes, the traffic did at times slow right down and the last hour was at times down to a crawl.

d8c3f090-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG d8417a20-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

d96b2d10-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

da470e20-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG IMG_6985.JPG

dae8cc60-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

da95f170-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG IMG_6989.JPG

d9c9eee0-58b7-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG d9a15840-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

db829b60-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

I should have remembered that the Lotus Temple in Delhi was close by the road to the airport so again can add that to my future list of places to see.

As Ashok’s daughter had her birthday that night and he lives an hour away from the airport, there was no point for him to take me somewhere for dinner so it was an airport dinner once check in was done.

The last 16 days travelled some approximately 2,870 kms / 1,780 miles, so thanks to Ashok for your driving skills and not to my knowledge hitting any vehicles or people. I won’t miss your phone ring tone though!

With check in opening at 7pm / 19:00, it was a bit of a wait but at least I had power to charge my camera batteries. With Premium Economy there was no queue at the check in counter. Got my boarding pass for both of the next 2 sectors but no upgrade.

db5617b0-58b8-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

Dinner up in the food court taking the non-veg combo 480 rupees / NZ$10 / US$6.80. Plus GST came to 505 rupees / NZ$10.50 / US$7.10.

dbf64f50-58b8-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG dba37460-58b8-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

db5cce70-58b8-11e9-9a41-b92a8a2dcf2d.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 14:14 Archived in India Tagged agra mehtab_bagh Comments (0)

58 ~ Agra Fort

Imposing gates & walls of red sandstone & a moat


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Agra Fort was by car only a few minutes away. Lies on the bend of the river Yamuna, almost in the heart of the town. Akbar built it as his citadel over the years 1563-73 in the finest architectural style. It has imposing gates and walls of red sandstone and a moat.

This is what Lonely Planet has to say …

With the Taj Mahal overshadowing it, one can easily forget that Agra has one of the finest Mughal forts in India. Walking through courtyard after courtyard of this palatial red-sandstone and marble fortress, your amazement grows as the scale of what was built here begins to sink in.

Construction along the bank of the Yamuna River was begun by Emperor Akbar in 1565 on the site of an earlier fort. Further additions were made, particularly by his grandson Shah Jahan, using his favourite building material – white marble. The fort was built primarily as a military structure, but Shah Jahan transformed it into a palace, and later it became his gilded prison for eight years after his son Aurangzeb seized power in 1658.

The ear-shaped fort’s colossal double walls rise more than 20m and measure 2.5km in circumference. The Yamuna River originally flowed along the straight eastern edge of the fort, and the emperors had their own bathing ghats here. It contains a maze of buildings, forming a city within a city, including vast underground sections, though many of the structures were destroyed over the years by Nadir Shah, the Marathas, the Jats and finally the British, who used the fort as a garrison. Even today, much of the fort is used by the military and is off-limits to the general public.

The Amar Singh Gate to the south is the sole entry point to the fort these days and where you buy your entrance ticket. Its dogleg design was meant to confuse attackers who made it past the first line of defence – the crocodile-infested moat.

Following the plain processional way you reach a gateway and the huge red-sandstone Jehangir’s Palace on the right. In front of the palace is Hauz-i-Jehangir, a huge bowl carved out of a single block of stone, which was used for bathing. The palace was probably built by Akbar for his son Jehangir. With tall stone pillars and corner brackets, it blends Indian and Central Asian architectural styles, a reminder of the Mughals’ Turkestani cultural roots.

Further along the eastern edge of the fort you’ll find the Khas Mahal, a beautiful marble pavilion and pool that formed the living quarters of Shah Jahan. Taj views are framed in the ornate marble grills.

The large courtyard here is Anguri Bagh, a garden that has been brought back to life in recent years. In the courtyard is an innocuous-looking entrance – now locked – that leads down a flight of stairs into a two-storey labyrinth of underground rooms and passageways where Akbar used to keep his 500-strong harem. On the northeast corner of the courtyard you can get a glimpse of the Shish Mahal (Mirror Palace), with walls inlaid with tiny mirrors.

Just to the north of the Khas Mahal s the Mathamman (Shah) Burj, the wonderful white-marble octagonal tower and palace where Shah Jahan was imprisoned for eight years until his death in 1666, and from where he could gaze out at the Taj Mahal, the tomb of his wife. When he died, Shah Jahan’s body was taken from here by boat to the Taj. From here ascend to the upper level via the now closed Mina Masjid, which served as Shah Jahan's private mosque.

As you enter the large courtyard, along the eastern wall of the fort, is Diwan-i-Khas (Hall of Private Audiences), which was reserved for important dignitaries or foreign representatives. The hall once housed Shah Jahan’s legendary Peacock Throne, which was inset with precious stones – including the famous Koh-i-noor diamond. The throne was taken to Delhi by Aurangzeb, then to Iran in 1739 by Nadir Shah and dismantled after his assassination in 1747. Overlooking the river and the distant Taj Mahal is Takhti-i-Jehangir, a huge slab of black rock with an inscription around the edge. The throne that stood here was made for Jehangir when he was Prince Salim.

Following the north side of the courtyard a side door leads to the tiny but exquisite white-marbled Nagina Masjid (Gem Mosque), built in 1635 by Shah Jahan for the ladies of the court. Down below was the Ladies’ Bazaar, where the court ladies bought their goods.

A hidden doorway near the mosque exit leads down to the scallop-shaped arches of the large, open Diwan-i-Am, which was used by Shah Jahan for domestic government business, and features a beautifully decorated throne room where the emperor listened to petitioners. In front of it is the small and rather incongruous grave of John Colvin, a lieutenant-governor of the northwest provinces who died of an illness while sheltering in the fort during the 1857 First War of Independence. To the north is the Moti Masjid, currently off-limits to visitors. From here head back to the Amar Singh gate.

You can walk to the fort from Taj Ganj via the leafy Shah Jahan Park, or take an autorickshaw for ₹80. Food is not allowed into the fort. The fort opens 30 minutes before sunset; the ticket office opens 15 minutes before that. Last entry is 30 minutes before sunset.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/agra/attractions/a/poi-sig/356509

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

The Taj Mahal invariably steals the spotlight in Agra but the city also has one of India's most significant Mughal forts. Four generations of influential Mughal emperors ruled from Agra Fort, while Agra was the capital of the flourishing Mughal Empire. The fort was among the first monuments in India to be declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983. It reflects both the strength and splendor of the Mughal dynasty, which dominated India over three centuries.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/agra-fort-india-guide-4162022

c86f3de0-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG c724e390-58b1-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

dc64e510-58b7-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

c68fa870-58b1-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

c8e705f0-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG

c70d8b00-58b1-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

large_cca5e2b0-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG

c8225660-58b1-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

cb052b00-58b1-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG cbf9c430-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG

cce69530-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG c85218f0-58b1-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

cdf80530-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG

cdc5d1a0-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG

cb1fb7e0-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG

c7b67530-58b1-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG cd2b1840-58b1-11e9-891d-2daa5e37fa76.JPG

c7c80160-58b1-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

c91bf8a0-58b1-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

bb78cd30-58b2-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

ba1804b0-58b2-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

bae42e50-58b2-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG b83736c0-58b2-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

bb31b210-58b2-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

b959bdc0-58b2-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

b9f75d50-58b2-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG bb281520-58b2-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

IMG_6860.JPG

b83b5570-58b2-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

IMG_6863.JPG ba518b40-58b2-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

46140c20-58b3-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

43d28090-58b3-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

451b2d30-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

IMG_6867.JPG IMG_6868.JPG

44cbd4b0-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

4236f900-58b3-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

43f598f0-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

IMG_6872.JPG

IMG_6873.JPG

45dd92d0-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

466f4b80-58b3-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

IMG_6876.JPG

be824730-58b3-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

IMG_6878.JPG

IMG_6879.JPG 35e1d160-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

bfb43780-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG c08a2520-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

large_bed0dc60-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

c1ba19a0-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG c1c34160-58b3-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

be390930-58b3-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

beeb1b20-58b3-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

be2496d0-58b3-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

338e9290-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

large_IMG_6883.JPG

IMG_6884.JPG 35aa46a0-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

IMG_6891.JPG

335a8a40-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

32a9d7e0-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG IMG_6882.JPG

327114a0-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

35899f40-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

364e9cf0-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG af5b61f0-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

ad0eb2d0-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

afe37db0-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

IMG_6904.JPG

b0dc0e80-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG IMG_6902.JPG

b078b8d0-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG b0c81150-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

b0694f80-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

aebd4d30-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG ae2998b0-58b4-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

acb9dc10-58b4-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

2369ec60-58b5-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

259fb820-58b5-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

25434040-58b5-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

IMG_6915.JPG

235be2a0-58b5-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

251cf390-58b5-11e9-b9ba-054c90c232a3.JPG

26d292d0-58b5-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

254ae160-58b5-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

2653ecf0-58b5-11e9-a9de-876cbc749509.JPG

227fda80-58b5-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG 258fd9a0-58b5-11e9-bf8f-8bf9ae101240.JPG

Waiting for the car to arrive ... outside Agra Fort

IMG_6928.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 01:36 Archived in India Tagged agra agra_fort Comments (0)

57 ~ Taj Mahal in the morning misty fog

Day 16 : See it reveal itself in the rising sun - with and without PEOPLE!


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

One of the highlights of the trip that I was looking forward to was to see and capture through my lens the “cleaned up” Taj Mahal (Taj) just finished last year peeping through Agra’s famous morning winter fog and then see it reveal itself in the rising sun - with and without PEOPLE! I wasn’t disappointed.

With the alarm set for 6am / 06:00 it was a really early morning rise and a short 15 minute walk back to the Taj. To me the only advantage with the Amar Hotel was its location and closeness to the West Gate of the Taj.

In the darkness the newspaper sellers were sorting their papers before delivery.

IMG_6627.JPG 1cfcce10-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

1cf09910-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG 1c06d550-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

1bf52210-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG IMG_6632.JPG

Sure, there was no queue at the left hand foreigner’s ticket window and paid my 1,100 rupees / NZ$22.90 / US$15.50 as I did not want to go back into the mausoleum or up to that level for the extra 200 rupees / NZ$4.20 / US$2.80.

The male foreigner’s queue already at 6.30am / 06:30 had about 100 people. Much worst still in the male Indian queue. I should have followed my instinct and got up a bit earlier as opposed told to leave the hotel at 6.30pm / 06:30.

At security, knowing from yesterday afternoon visit what I was allowed to bring in ... literally nothing so it was a breeze after a full pat down. The person in the next line had a flashlight inside his go pro stick and this was taken away. Yes, he had the option of going back out and putting it inside a locker. So pay heed as to what you cannot take in! The list is quite long including crayons that I read somewhere.

Here are the “Do’s and Don’ts” from the https://www.tajmahal.gov.in/do%26nots.html

Do's

• Tourists must co-operate in keeping the monument neat & clean by using dustbins.
• Tourists are advised to hire approved guides & photographers who exhibit their identity cards.
• Taj Museum inside Taj Mahal Complex opens from 10.00 AM to 5.00 PM, entry free.
• No Polluting vehicles are allowed within 500 mts. radius of Taj Mahal.

Don'ts

• Drone camera is strictly prohibited inside the Taj Mahal.
• Eating and smoking is strictly prohibited inside Taj Mahal. Arms, ammunitions, fire, smoking items, tobacco products, liquor, eatables (Toffees), head phones, knives, wire, mobile charger, electric goods (except camera), Tripods are also prohibited.
• Mobile phones are to be kept switched off or on silent mode.
• Please avoid carrying big bags and books inside the monument, this may increase your security check time.
• Photography is prohibited inside the main mausoleum.
• No Polluting vehicles are allowed within 500 mts. Radius of Taj Mahal.
• Avoid touching & scratching the walls & surfaces of the monument as these are heritage sites and need special care.
• Visitors are requested not to make noise inside the mausoleum.
• Above mentioned list of prohibited items along with mobile phones are banned for night viewing of the Taj Mahal. Video camera, extra batteries are prohibited though still camera is permitted after the security check.

With the moon high above, entered and in the distance the Taj was shrouded in fog.

1badb8d0-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

The Great gate (Darwaza-i rauza)

1b8d1170-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

1ae5fc00-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG 1adaff80-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

1b55d4d0-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

large_1b1f3470-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

IMG_6645.JPG

84a95510-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

8484dd20-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

One of the locals came up and said “I am not a guide but the caretaker. I can show you different angles of the Taj for you to take pictures”. So off I went with him. Yes, I knew what was happening so I let him point out to me where to stand using the trees to better frame the Taj. After a while I simply said that I have no money which was true as I only took with me the entrance fee … so off he went. We saw each other several times afterwards and he was doing the same “sales pitch” with other tourists.

Tried to get as many of the Taj and it’s 4 minarets framed by the arches and trees. Plus the angles that you don’t see in the brochures.

86c86480-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

86842f90-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

85b8a230-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

large_856ccc20-583d-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

862baf50-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_IMG_6652.JPG

857111e0-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_IMG_6659.JPG

873caa20-583d-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

20887060-583e-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

IMG_6661.JPG

20978b90-583e-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

21c33a50-583e-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

20406ae0-583e-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_21352b20-583e-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

2188c960-583e-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

2135c760-583e-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

210393d0-583e-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

The Great gate (Darwaza-i rauza)

large_IMG_6675.JPG

23136100-583e-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

large_22988bb0-583e-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

With the winter’s misty fog slowly moving in and out at different levels, it gradually got brighter and was a surreal experience.

IMG_6680.JPG

14ff4b50-583f-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_146491f0-583f-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

13ed3f10-583f-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

158173a0-583f-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

15337ab0-583f-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

Come 7.30am / 07:30 the golden ball of sun finally rose behind the Jawab.

large_14a396c0-583f-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

large_142da370-583f-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

147dbf40-583f-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

Yes, I walked around the Taj many times trying to capture it from different angles but also took time to just sit, people watch of the ever-changing scene and take in the majesty of the place as the sun reflected off the newly cleaned building.

155bc330-583f-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

13694200-583f-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

12fa5390-583f-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_c0256190-583f-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

be926580-583f-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

bec47200-583f-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

bed27bc0-583f-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

bf27c7b0-583f-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

large_bfcbcfe0-583f-11e9-b30d-2f81535f48ba.JPG

bf6b6060-583f-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

be97e3c0-583f-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

bf7a2d70-583f-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

bf3a6550-583f-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

bfc0ac50-583f-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

c1278f50-583f-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

27da4d00-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

291bcdb0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

281707e0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_27e2ff90-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

IMG_6711.JPG

28abcdd0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_27f2de10-5840-11e9-b30d-2f81535f48ba.JPG

296077d0-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

295be3f0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

28ba25b0-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

large_2842f9e0-5840-11e9-b30d-2f81535f48ba.JPG

2890a4b0-5840-11e9-b30d-2f81535f48ba.JPG

9a8bb870-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

9d1856c0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

9c856590-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

9d6405c0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

9ab7d180-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

large_9b9e60f0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

9b3a9610-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

9be04bf0-5840-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

9d7bd380-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

9de36ef0-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

9c842d10-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG 9b8e0d40-5840-11e9-88f4-577ee633e9e9.JPG

IMG_6739.JPG

large_IMG_6741.JPG

IMG_6740.JPG

large_085d46c0-5841-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

IMG_6742.JPG

large_IMG_6744.JPG

IMG_6746.JPG IMG_6745.JPG

IMG_6748.JPG
0848fb70-5841-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

IMG_6747.JPG 08939900-5841-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

c9362c40-5841-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG

c8c038f0-5841-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG

c7b3d200-5841-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG

IMG_6756.JPG

Mosque

IMG_6759.JPG IMG_6757.JPG IMG_6760.JPG

caa46240-5841-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG

A photo shoot was in progress in the mosque entrance.

47479470-5842-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

4893ea90-5842-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG 43e27070-5842-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG 485708a0-5842-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

44dfbc30-5842-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG

42e41340-5842-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG 440d7810-5842-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG 42a842c0-5842-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

4431a1e0-5842-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG 474a0570-5842-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG

IMG_6779.JPG

443d1390-5842-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG 47d2e480-5842-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

IMG_6780.JPG IMG_6783.JPG 474c7670-5842-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

4484a3e0-5842-11e9-9baa-39f2331a2e7a.JPG

large_4216d830-5842-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

IMG_6785.JPG

48876770-5842-11e9-a0da-072359ee8d71.JPG

IMG_6792.JPG

large_IMG_6789.JPG

484d6bb0-5842-11e9-a0da-072359ee8d71.JPG

IMG_6795.JPG

large_7bdec180-5843-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

7d91c8b0-5843-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

7d59a1b0-5843-11e9-bd0a-3113fda5bdcc.JPG

7b13d060-5843-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

large_7d6dc5f0-5843-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

large_7d6ded00-5843-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

IMG_6803.JPG

7d965c90-5843-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG IMG_6804.JPG

1079d0f0-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

10178cb0-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

11139ff0-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

11327290-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

0f476b70-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

0fca7e20-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

0f781860-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

11dbaae0-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

11e4d2a0-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

11a1d630-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

120ccd00-5844-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

117f8120-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

80faa0c0-5844-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

IMG_6818.JPG

large_IMG_6819.JPG

80330b00-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

7f011ab0-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

IMG_6825.JPG

IMG_6824.JPG

7fc79f00-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

8074cef0-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

80a8d740-5844-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

7d77e2a0-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

80dae3c0-5844-11e9-a8b7-bd9dc6e68b48.JPG

The Great gate (Darwaza-i rauza)

813a68e0-5844-11e9-a550-2bf59b7a3a6c.JPG

8112e3b0-5844-11e9-ac1d-e3a821c60a68.JPG

Spent 2.5 hours here till 9.30am / 09:30 seeing the sun rise and the light changed ever so slowly on the main gate, reflecting pools from various angles, guest house, Mosque and of course the Taj Mahal itself in its various moods as the sun rose.

Gary Arndt of “Everything Everywhere” wrote …

https://www.facebook.com/EverythingEverywhere/

Everything is familiar with the Taj Mahal. Many of you may have even visited it.
⠀⠀⠀
Almost every photo you see of the Taj Mahal is the same. It is a symmetrical image of the structure taken directly in front of it, most probably from the exact same spot where I took this photo.
⠀⠀⠀
I’ve seen many people try to take this same photo, and the results aren’t the same, even though they stood in the exact same spot that I did. Here is what you need to do to take the perfect shot of the Taj Mahal:

1. Make sure everything is symmetrical. This is where most people screw up. They align everything, so it is almost symmetrical, but not quite. The way to ensure that it is perfect is to make the the reflection of the spire in the central dome is aligned with the fountains in the center of the reflecting pool.
⠀⠀⠀
2. Get there early. The doors opened at 7am the day I was there. Depending on the time of year, they might open earlier. Officially, they claim to open 30 minutes after sunrise. I showed up at 5:30am to make sure I was first in line, which I was.
⠀⠀⠀
3. Run or walk briskly to the first gate where you will see the Taj for the first time. You have about 100m to cover and there will be other people behind you in line. You don’t have to run, but you do need to be quick. Everyone else with you will want the same shot.
⠀⠀⠀
4. Be prepared. When you get to the railing past the gate, that is where you will get this shot. If you are one of the first ones there, you will have a few minutes where you can photograph the building without any people in the image. Have all your settings set beforehand. You probably won’t have time to mess with a tripod. This photo was not shot with a tripod.
⠀⠀⠀
5. Once you get this shot, then you can relax a bit. People will be streaming around you and the grounds will start to fill up. I’d head to the building to the right of the Taj where you will be able to get images of the Taj through an archway. Walk around the exterior of the building and get your shots in the early morning light before you decide to enter.
⠀⠀⠀
6. If you have the time, consider going across the river to photograph the Taj in the morning the day after. If you are lucky.

Had to leave around 9.30am / 09:30 as breakfast service back at the hotel finished at 10am / 10:00. So, after a quick breakfast was ready to leave before 10.30am / 10:30 for the next sight.

Posted by bruceontour 01:42 Archived in India Tagged taj taj_mahal Comments (0)

56 ~ Taj Mahal at sunset : Agra

Far too busy with too many people in front of me


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Now 2.30pm / 14:30 and continued the short 35 km / 22 miles distance through to Agra.

With the traffic it was 3.30pm / 15:30 when I checked in at the 3-star Hotel Amar, my only 3-star hotel on this trip. I forgot that in India to be a 4-star hotel it has to have a pool. Yes, the 4-star hotels that I stayed at with pools were nice, but it was winter and I didn’t want a swim so perhaps 3-star hotels would have been enough. Never mind.

Sanjay was the local guide for Agra and he was waiting at the hotel. Sun was about to set in a couple of hours so no time to waste at the hotel.

Little needs to be said about this architectural wonder which is always the soul raison-de-etre for every tourist’s visit to Agra. Built by Shahjehan, the Taj Mahal (Taj) is a white marble memorial to his beautiful wife Mumtaz Mahal.

This is what Lonely Planet has to say …

Poet Rabindranath Tagore described it as 'a teardrop on the cheek of eternity'; Rudyard Kipling as 'the embodiment of all things pure'; while its creator, Emperor Shah Jahan, said it made 'the sun and the moon shed tears from their eyes'. Every year, tourists numbering more than twice the population of Agra pass through its gates to catch a once-in-a-lifetime glimpse of what is widely considered the most beautiful building in the world. Few leave disappointed.

The Taj Mahal was built by Shah Jahan as a memorial for his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth to their 14th child in 1631. The death of Mumtaz left the emperor so heartbroken that his hair is said to have turned grey virtually overnight. Construction of the Taj began the following year; although the main building is thought to have been built in eight years, the whole complex was not completed until 1653. Not long after it was finished, Shah Jahan was overthrown by his son Aurangzeb and imprisoned in Agra Fort, where for the rest of his days he could only gaze out at his creation through a window. Following his death in 1666, Shah Jahan was buried here alongside his beloved Mumtaz.

In total, some 20,000 people from India and Central Asia worked on the building. Specialists were brought in from as far away as Europe to produce the exquisite marble screens and pietra dura (marble inlay work) made with thousands of semiprecious stones.

The Taj was designated a World Heritage Site in 1983 and looks nearly as immaculate today as when it was first constructed – though it underwent a huge restoration project in the early 20th century.

Entry & Information

Note: the Taj is closed every Friday to anyone not attending prayers at the mosque.

The Taj can be accessed through the west and east gates. The south gate was closed to visitors in 2018 for security concerns but can be used to exit the Taj. The east gate generally has shorter queues. There are separate queues for men and women at both gates. Once you get your ticket, you can skip ahead of the lines of Indians waiting to get in – one perk of your pricey entry fee. It's possible to buy your tickets online in advance at https://asi.payumoney.com (you'll get a ₹50 discount for your troubles), but you won't save much time as you still have to join the main security queue. A ticket that includes entrance to the mausoleum itself cost ₹200 extra.

Cameras and videos are permitted, but you can't take photographs inside the mausoleum itself. Tripods are banned.

Remember to retrieve your free 500ml bottle of water and shoe covers (included in Taj ticket price). If you keep your ticket, you get small entry-fee discounts when visiting Agra Fort, Fatehpur Sikri, Akbar's Tomb or the Itimad-ud-Daulah on the same day. Bags much bigger than a money pouch are not allowed inside; free bag storage is available. Any food or tobacco will be confiscated when you go through security, as will pens.

Inside the Grounds

From both the east and west gates you first enter a monumental inner courtyard with an impressive 30m red-sandstone gateway on the south side.

The ornamental gardens are set out along classical Mughal Charbagh (formal Persian garden) lines – a square quartered by watercourses, with an ornamental marble plinth at its centre. When the fountains are not flowing, the Taj is beautifully reflected in the water.

The Taj Mahal itself stands on a raised marble platform at the northern end of the ornamental gardens, with its back to the Yamuna River. Its raised position means that the backdrop is only sky – a masterstroke of design.

Purely decorative 40m-high white minarets grace each corner of the platform. After more than three centuries they are not quite perpendicular, but they may have been designed to lean slightly outwards so that in the event of an earthquake they would fall away from the precious Taj. The red-sandstone mosque to the west is an important gathering place for Agra's Muslims. The identical building to the east, the jawab, was built for symmetry.

The central Taj structure is made of semi-translucent white marble, carved with flowers and inlaid with thousands of semiprecious stones in beautiful patterns. A perfect exercise in symmetry, the four identical faces of the Taj feature impressive vaulted arches embellished with pietra dura scrollwork and quotations from the Quran in a style of calligraphy using inlaid jasper. The whole structure is topped off by four small domes surrounding the famous bulbous central dome.

Directly below the main dome is the Cenotaph of Mumtaz Mahal, an elaborate false tomb surrounded by an exquisite perforated marble screen inlaid with dozens of different types of semiprecious stones. Beside it, offsetting the symmetry of the Taj, is the Cenotaph of Shah Jahan, who was interred here with little ceremony by his usurping son Aurangzeb in 1666. Light is admitted into the central chamber by finely cut marble screens.

The real tombs of Mumtaz Mahal and Shah Jahan are in a basement room below the main chamber.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/agra/attractions/a/poi-sig/356509

With the foreigners window only having a person in front of me, tickets were quickly brought, picked up the complementary shoe cover to protect the marble floors and bottle of water.

For once, I did not mind segregation. You will have a totally different experience at the Taj depending on whether you purchase a “High Value Ticket” (as all foreign visitors seem to), or a “General Ticket.” This begins from the very moment you walk in the door to the main courtyard: High Value Ticket-holders slide into the yard in minutes, while the General Ticket line stretches for blocks.

The same applied with the queue entering the Taj Mahal mausoleum itself.

Sanjay had already told me earlier what I was allowed to take in so was prepared for a quick entry through security.

It was far too busy with too many people in front of me at the main gate to fully enjoy that magnificent first view of the Taj itself.

4ab2d0c0-5833-11e9-9fbd-7f11fab20ea7.JPG 4ab36d00-5833-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

After its year long clean up completed last year, it was wonderful to see it in the distance.

4c27e490-5833-11e9-9fbd-7f11fab20ea7.JPG 4b4ec2a0-5833-11e9-8fdc-cb9560132cf5.JPG

IMG_6511.JPG

The Great gate (Darwaza-i rauza)

So, after the briefing from Sanjay and taking the usual photos of pinching the top or lifting the Taj, I was again let loose.

large_4b310170-5833-11e9-8352-0d2e5ef56673.JPG

4e73a950-5833-11e9-8fdc-cb9560132cf5.JPG 4c427170-5833-11e9-8fdc-cb9560132cf5.JPG

4c8a4fe0-5833-11e9-8fdc-cb9560132cf5.JPG

IMG_6528.JPG

4c0fa1a0-5833-11e9-8fdc-cb9560132cf5.JPG 4dc9fbd0-5833-11e9-8fdc-cb9560132cf5.JPG 4aec0930-5833-11e9-9fbd-7f11fab20ea7.JPG

Thereafter, visit the Taj Mahal mausoleum and on with the disposable overshoes to protect the marble floor. As for people not allowed to take photos and no noise inside ... you guessed it … they were!

IMG_6531.JPG

large_6f3d1370-5837-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

Two red buildings flanked the Taj. The mosque and Jawab. Definition of a Jawab is a building (as the false mosque of the Taj Mahal) erected to correspond to or balance another. Read that it was the guest house.

71375cd0-5837-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

large_IMG_6535.JPG

IMG_6537.JPG

7146ed30-5837-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

IMG_6540.JPG

71fef290-5837-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

large_70a5a420-5837-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

72cd6620-5837-11e9-a226-f9c6085bf787.JPG

71b93700-5837-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

710417d0-5837-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

Lotus Pool – named after its lotus shaped fountain spouts, the pool reflects the tomb.

It was the refection in the blue pools in front of the Taj and the main gate that really captivated me, hence so many images. How to take it? From up High or down Low? Centre down the middle or from the left or from the right?

721316d0-5837-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

large_6fd5d100-5837-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

706825f0-5837-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

IMG_6546.JPG

9fcbfeb0-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

9d4294b0-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

large_9e5479e0-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

9d9ce9b0-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

large_9fa71190-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

9ea1d690-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

9f726d00-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

9db72870-5838-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG 9e7d1080-5838-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

a02e42f0-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

Then there was that iconic 1992 Princess Di seat photo, but I had my legs going the wrong way. Plus, there were two marble seats and Princess Di was sitting on the lower one, not the one that I was on.

da0a9ea0-5839-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

9e18d070-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

9d26a840-5838-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

dcb65db0-5839-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

9eff11c0-5838-11e9-a26b-c7f18fb72dcd.JPG

Just look at the changing light and eventually see the people leave. It was busy when I got there. Again mainly local Indian tourists.

dac22ed0-5839-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

da651ab0-5839-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

db813910-5839-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

large_dbfcaaa0-5839-11e9-bd09-e995fd8f3685.JPG

dcde5810-5839-11e9-bd09-e995fd8f3685.JPG

IMG_6592.JPG

IMG_6593.JPG

IMG_6595.JPG

dcdcd170-5839-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

large_dd6ed840-5839-11e9-bc9f-2962bb3e9542.JPG

ffbb4040-583a-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

ff8f7550-583a-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

00f8c950-583b-11e9-9270-e7308c3c393a.JPG

ff5b45f0-583a-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

dc114410-5839-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

0043d130-583b-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

00a66390-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

IMG_6608.JPG

004e0a60-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

There wasn’t much of a sunset to speak of today which was a shame. Originally Sanjay said the place closed at sunset. Then he wanted me to meet and leave at 5.10pm / 17:10 but no … I had come all this way and decided to stay to the bitter end when the gates really closed at 6pm / 18:00. Really glad that I did.

01d100e0-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG 00f43570-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

01ac13c0-583b-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

large_01362070-583b-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

02990bd0-583b-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

On the way back to the hotel, off to see a marble inlay workshop and you got it ... it was so that I could buy some souvenirs which was not going to happen.

d86bf7e0-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

e7babb00-583b-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

e788d590-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG e79f43c0-583b-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG

Being New Year’s Eve, it was a compulsory dinner at this hotel. Let’s just say the menu was not to my liking. Plus, I was placed by an open drafty door that I asked to be closed many times, which it was then re-opened … Plus I pad 1,800 rupees as part of the hotel package yet the brochure I saw had just 900 rupees. So, what’s up? Who’s making 100% mark up? Or is the 900 rupee coupon part of the 1,800 rupee package?

e7a1b4c0-583b-11e9-9270-e7308c3c393a.JPG e6af8c90-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

e741ba70-583b-11e9-9378-8311807855c0.JPG

e8301210-583b-11e9-9459-51c27d962a47.JPG IMG_6625.JPG

e81e85e0-583b-11e9-8c2c-b1cd7e669411.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 23:14 Archived in India Tagged taj taj_mahal agra Comments (0)

55 ~ Fatehpur Sikri

Day 15 : Wish I had more time here - cattle market


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Last full day and the trip was nearing its end with the major attraction of the Taj Mahal still to come.

After breakfast was the drive to Agra enroute visiting Fatehpur Sikri first.

IMG_6323.JPG

IMG_6324.JPG IMG_6325.JPG

3f0c18a0-487d-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 458f4580-487d-11e9-9594-4d8654e29501.JPG

401b3eb0-487d-11e9-b8be-05bfd31b116e.JPG 3ebff470-487d-11e9-b8be-05bfd31b116e.JPG

On route passed a cattle market or actually selling mainly goats. I had just 5 minutes and honestly wish I had more time here. Again literally as soon as I walked in was asked by the locals for me to take their photo so absolutely no issues here.

41e30660-487d-11e9-b8be-05bfd31b116e.JPG 3fa87fb0-487d-11e9-b8be-05bfd31b116e.JPG

42170eb0-487d-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 40a974f0-487d-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 44c65030-487d-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

large_IMG_6339.JPG

IMG_6342.JPG IMG_6340.JPG

IMG_6341.JPG

large_45c01980-487d-11e9-b8be-05bfd31b116e.JPG

IMG_6343.JPG

IMG_6347.JPG

45ed1cf0-487d-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 44d7dc60-487d-11e9-b8be-05bfd31b116e.JPG

Not much further along was Ashok’s meal break and I finally got a stamp to post Eve her post card. Something I started to do on my 2011 Galapagos trip from Post Office Bay, Floreana where we could deliver post cards to people in cities we are to visit as well as place post cards or letters for future delivery by anyone. No postage stamps were required. How did it all start? A barrel was placed here in the late 18th century by English whaling vessels to be used as a post office. Passing ships would stop to leave mail for loved ones, collecting at the same time any mail destined for ports on their itineraries. Today the box is used mainly by us tourists who drop off and pick up unstamped letters to be carried to far away destinations. …

http://v2.travelark.org/travel-blog-entry/bruceontour/7/1325766339

df967710-487e-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

dfeb4dd0-487e-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG IMG_6350.JPG

e601fd40-487e-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

e05e33e0-487e-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG e8a13930-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

e138dc70-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG ea3e2050-487e-11e9-8bb8-198082183097.JPG

e612c620-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

IMG_6355.JPG

More fields of yellow mustard and brick kilns dotted the countryside.

e9668500-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG IMG_6358.JPG

e85da080-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

e6ba77d0-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG e34b8fd0-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

e2cd1100-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG e461e1d0-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

e97fb250-487e-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

IMG_6362.JPG e6f13f40-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

e9f57e90-487e-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG
Blankets - remember it's winter here in India

IMG_6369.JPG e41bd820-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG e4db7ea0-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

e686bda0-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG IMG_6372.JPG

e4fbb0d0-487e-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG e082d2e0-487e-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

Finally at 1pm / 13:00 arrived at Fatehpur Sikri.

An impressive sandstone fortress was built in the 16th century and only occupied for a few years before being abandoned, leaving the buildings in virtually perfect condition.

Aimit was the local guide here.

acca4930-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

Aimit

Had to catch the CNG powered bus (10 rupees each way) the short distance to Fatehpur Sikri from the car park. This was one way that authorities could try and cut back the effect of pollution on the buildings. Not only here but also at the Taj. I can see this practice happening throughout India.

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

A city that was once the proud capital of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century, Fatehpur Sikri now stands deserted as a well-preserved ghost town. It was abandoned by its occupants after only 15 years due to an insufficient water supply.

Fatehpur Sikri was established by Emperor Akbar from the twin villages of Fatehpur and Sikri as a tribute to the famous Sufi saint, Sheikh Salim Chishti. The saint accurately predicted the birth of Emperor Akbar's much longed for son.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/fatehpur-sikri-essential-travel-guide-1539341

This is what Lonely Planet has to say …

This magnificent fortified ancient city, 40km west of Agra, was the short-lived capital of the Mughal empire between 1572 and 1585, during the reign of Emperor Akbar. Earlier, Akbar had visited the village of Sikri to consult the Sufi saint Shaikh Salim Chishti, who predicted the birth of an heir to the Mughal throne. When the prophecy came true, Akbar built his new capital here, including a stunning mosque, still in use today, and three palaces, one for each of his favourite wives – one a Hindu, one a Muslim and one a Christian (though Hindu villagers in Sikri dispute these claims).

The city was an Indo-Islamic masterpiece but was erected in an area that supposedly suffered from water shortages and so was abandoned shortly after Akbar’s death. The red-sandstone palace walls are at their most atmospheric and photogenic near sunset.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/uttar-pradesh/fatehpur-sikri

afc1de50-4881-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG b1ddb970-4881-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

IMG_6381.JPG

b008ab50-4881-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG af16f850-4881-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

Diwan-i-Khas

ae105dc0-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

b29597c0-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG
ad5f3630-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG b31c53f0-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

Panch Mahal (left)

large_af0ac350-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

Panch Mahal ~ Diwan-i-Khas ~ Diwan-i-Aam

b09d2320-4881-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG b214a7f0-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

b3f6d570-4881-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG af7ebad0-4881-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG ddfbb600-4882-11e9-a546-d166503c353a.JPG

b401d1f0-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG b3a0c630-4881-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

IMG_6397.JPG

large_dbecfa40-4882-11e9-b438-d35d57787c57.JPG

Diwan-i-Khas

db6fdb00-4882-11e9-b438-d35d57787c57.JPG

IMG_6403.JPG IMG_6404.JPG

dedaa450-4882-11e9-a546-d166503c353a.JPG

dce8e670-4882-11e9-a546-d166503c353a.JPG ddf35190-4882-11e9-b438-d35d57787c57.JPG

Panch Mahal

large_dc3cef00-4882-11e9-b438-d35d57787c57.JPG

Panch Mahal ~ Turkish Sultana’s House

dc6a1980-4882-11e9-a546-d166503c353a.JPG

large_7db83290-4883-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

Diwan-i-Khas ~ Turkish Sultana’s House

7f5826f0-4883-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 7ddf69a0-4883-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

Khwabgah – Emperor’s private sleeping quarters

7dd7a170-4883-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

IMG_6411.JPG

IMG_6414.JPG

IMG_6415.JPG

7e5f9620-4883-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

IMG_6417.JPG

7e123970-4883-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

IMG_6419.JPG

13f11380-4884-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

large_1388dbd0-4884-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

Mariam Palace

13428400-4884-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 13c8f210-4884-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

14c4b730-4884-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

Badshahi Darwaza – Royal gateway to enter the complex

IMG_6425.JPG

120bd8c0-4884-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Main Mosque

bfa475a0-4884-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG IMG_6427.JPG

Main Mosque ~ Tomb of Sheikh Salim Chishti ~ Tomb of Nawab Islam Khan

6761e570-4885-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Tomb of Sheikh Salim Chishti ~ Tomb of Nawab Islam Khan

large_14108260-4884-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Buland Darwaza ~ Main Mosque ~ Tomb of Sheikh Salim Chishti ~ Tomb of Nawab Islam Khan

c0e7a400-4884-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG c0f7a990-4884-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Hujra = cloistered prayer rooms

c1e31b00-4884-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG c2fcef70-4884-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

c1d02f40-4884-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

c282b660-4884-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG IMG_6435.JPG

Hujra = cloistered prayer rooms ~ Tomb of Sheikh Salim Chishti

c2c0f7e0-4884-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

Buland Darwaza

c1c273a0-4884-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

67a72bd0-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG 67a35b40-4885-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Main Mosque

68ab5560-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

IMG_6445.JPG

6938ef60-4885-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Buland Darwaza

68ca00f0-4885-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG IMG_6451.JPG

6a4a5f60-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

69aebba0-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG 69989b90-4885-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Buland Darwaza

ea596c50-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

e8ebab80-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

ebd1db80-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG ecab2480-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

ec28d520-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG ec950470-4885-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

ec49a390-4885-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

e9d2b020-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG e93ab5e0-4885-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

3a4af800-4886-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG 37cc8a80-4886-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

38c3e2d0-4886-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 36f0f790-4886-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

2ce94260-4887-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 2cf37b90-4887-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG 37176b50-4886-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

3a180120-4886-11e9-adac-ebd5fcfc9680.JPG

Buland Darwaza – 54 m / 177 ft gateway

IMG_6462.JPG IMG_6464.JPG

IMG_6467.JPG

2a727600-4887-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG 3945e410-4886-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Fatehpur Sikri

large_2a7cd640-4887-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

2ad77960-4887-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

I am not too sure but looks like Kandil (lamp) or it just could be an art piece for decoration only.

2da78950-4887-11e9-b543-3d84bc5a065d.JPG 2cdf0930-4887-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG

2b9b1780-4887-11e9-888d-1f690afffdb0.JPG 2afba330-4887-11e9-b4e8-691758c5b2ec.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 01:09 Archived in India Tagged fatehpur_sikri Comments (0)

54 ~ Jal Mahal or Water Palace + Albert Hall Museum : Jaipur

Flies were an issue


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Back into car at 1.25pm / 13:25 and into Jaipur for a late lunch at Green Pigeon.

IMG_6269.JPG

3906e640-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

38b061d0-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG 3a6d2d00-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

3ade8c70-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

3c17f6d0-4839-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG 359abd60-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

3ceb2550-4839-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

Green Pigeon is popular with foreigners probably due to the local guides taking them there. It was almost exclusively full of tourists.

Live cultural music. (Yes, you are expected to tip the dancers).

The first instrument that the man is playing is called Ravanhatha, similar to an instrument called ektara, meaning one string instrument.

The boy is holding an instrument called Khartal. Very widely used over Rajasthan, probably in every nook and children's learn this from very young age, though requires a lot of stamina and strength.

Ravanahatha is a primitive string instrument, made up of locally available materials like bamboo, metal pipes and strings, coconut shell, leather, and horse’s hair. It is largely believed fact that Ravanahatha is the precursor for the modern day string instruments like violin. Evidently, the method of playing a Ravanahatha is quite identical to that of playing a violin. It too includes a bow that is drawn across the strings to create musical vibrations. Furthermore, just alike violin, Ravanahatha has a fingerboard which is used to play the octaves.

The Khartal is another form of percussion commonly used for devotional/spiritual purposes. A bit like clappers, the Khartal has two pieces; one held in each hand. The “male” piece is thicker and held with the thumb, while the “female” piece is thinner, and balanced by the ring finger. “It has derived its name from [the] Hindi words ‘kara’ mean[ing] hand, and ‘tala’ mean[ing] clapping” (Wikipedia). This wooden clapper has metallic discs or plates that produce a clinking sound when clapped together. Therefore, it would be considered an Idiophone due to the combined properties of the vibrator and resonator. Rapid and complex rhythms are encouraged, as this instrument represents assertiveness, strength, and stamina.

https://www.ohmyrajasthan.com/ravanahatha

3a2bde40-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG 3b9e32f0-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

Flies were an issue.

Not good Trip Advisor reviews though!

Anyway, for me it was a Kingfisher lager 300 rupees / NZ$6.10 / US$4.20.
Chicken shami kebab 420 rupees / NZ$8.60 / US$5.90.
Garlic naan 100 rupees / NZ$2 / US$1.40.
Plus GST and a tip came to 1,000 rupees / NZ$20.20 / US$14.

3be3a060-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG 364184b0-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.jpeg

Chicken shami kebab

I read several times afterwards comments like this … Our driver recommended this place, so got suckered into it, we noticed lots of guides and drivers waiting outside so I assume they get commission for taking you.

https://www.facebook.com/GreenPigeonJaipur/?ref=py_c

Two more brief stops ….

Jal Mahal ~ Water Palace

Got to the Jal Mahal or Water Palace at 3.50pm / 15:50.

The Jal Mahal is the beautiful palace that appears to be floating on the still waters of lake Sagar. This iconic palace was constructed by the Muhjah during the 18th century as an overnight lodge, for use during his duck hunting trips. The Jal Mahal is one of the most charismatic buildings of Jaipur but can only be viewed from the banks of the lake, so a visit is usually less than 15 minutes.

Possibly the most serene sight amidst the chaos of Jaipur is the beautiful Jal Mahal Jaipur, the Water Palace. This low-rise symmetrical palace, that once was a shooting lodge for the Maharajah, appears to float in the centre of Sagar Lake. The light sand coloured stone walls of the Jal Mahal Jaipur are at a stark contrast to the deep blue of the waters of the lake, while from the innards of the palace lush foliage sprouts.

Tourists who view the Water Palace from the banks of Lake Sagar are often unaware of the technological and design achievements of the ancient palace. Though the palace only appears to be a single story there are actual a further four submerged levels. The solid stone walls hold back millions of litres of water and the special designed lime mortar has prevented water seepage for over 250 years.

The Jal Mahal was constructed from pink sandstone and follows the classical Rajput symmetrical style which is found throughout of Rajasthan. Jaipur’s government has made a tremendous effort to improve both the palace and the surrounding lake. Less than 10 years ago the palace was an abandoned ruin with water leaking in while the lake was a foul smelling sewage outlet but today wildlife teems within the lake’s waters a the place is back to its former glory.

The Jal Mahal when translated into English means the Water Palace but the complex was never intended to be used as a palace by Maharaja Madho Singh I. Madho Singh, who constructed the Jal Mahal in 1750, simply wished it to be a lodge for himself and his entourage during his duck hunting parties. Madho’s son Madho Singh II greatly enhanced the Jal Palace during the 18th century interior of the palace adding the courtyard grounds and much of the exterior as seen today.

http://www.jaipur-travel-guide.com/Jaipur-attractions/Jal-Mahal-Jaipur-Water-Palace.html

Anyway, it was as usual the scenes on the footpath with the locals that really interested me.

3cb26210-4839-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG 3d212970-4839-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

3b56a2a0-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG 3f6ffb70-4839-11e9-8c9b-f95b10a12e92.JPG

3fb011b0-4839-11e9-8c9b-f95b10a12e92.JPG

IMG_6287.JPG 3de0cff0-4839-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG

large_3e86fb00-4839-11e9-9ac3-bfd3cbb20272.JPG

3f768b20-4839-11e9-9ac3-bfd3cbb20272.JPG 3cf69700-4839-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

40352030-4839-11e9-8c9b-f95b10a12e92.JPG

IMG_6295.JPG IMG_6296.JPG

3dd73300-4839-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG IMG_6294.JPG

IMG_6300.JPG 415a6650-4839-11e9-8c9b-f95b10a12e92.JPG

bc077860-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

3d79a9b0-4839-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG 3e545240-4839-11e9-8c9b-f95b10a12e92.JPG

IMG_6299.JPG

IMG_6302.JPG IMG_6303.JPG

IMG_6304.JPG

IMG_6305.JPG IMG_6306.JPG

bb7a0570-483a-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG be642d10-483a-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

bcd68830-483a-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

b8f3a8b0-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

Albert Hall Museum

Finally, at 4.30pm / 16:30 got to the outside of the Albert Hall Museum.

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

This old and famous museum was modeled on the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, with a fusion of Islamic and Neo-Gothic architecture. It was established as a public museum in 1887. The collection includes portraits of local kings, costumes, woodcarvings, paintings, and arts and crafts. The museum is particularly notable for its Egyptian mummy, belonging to the Ptolemaic dynasty. Unfortunately photography isn't allowed. The museum is beautifully illuminated after dark and it opened for night viewing in 2015.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-jaipur-attractions-1539207

http://alberthalljaipur.gov.in/

bfc93b50-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG bcad0730-483a-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG

bee6ca90-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG bbeaefb0-483a-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG

bc421060-483a-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG be6f2990-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

IMG_6319.JPG

large_bffdb8d0-483a-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG

bc3edc10-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

Back to the hotel 4.40pm / 16:40 at the end of a rather full on day.

Was supposed to meet JD, my G Adventure’s CEO from one of my last India trips but he had to pull out at the last minute.

Dinner was next door in the food court at Vijs Bar-Be-Q = Tandoori chicken - Boneless tender dinner marinated skewered in a clay oven served with mint sauce 329 rupees / NZ$6.70 / US$4.60.
Garlic naan 60 rupees NZ$1.20 / US$0.80.
Plus GST came to 408 rupees / NZ$8.30 / US$5.70.

bcccc430-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG ba547130-483a-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG

"If you got to go, then you just got to go"

Seen around Jaipur.

be3e0770-483a-11e9-8038-b7414e83ae10.JPG

bf7c53d0-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG be31f980-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

beacced0-483a-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG IMG_5574.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 00:09 Archived in India Tagged jaipur albert_hall_museum jal_mahal water_palace ravanhatha khartal Comments (0)

53 ~ Amber Fort : Jaipur

Quicker if we had walked!


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

It took little time to drive out to Amber Fort.

ae22cd90-482f-11e9-a910-b9cd548df135.JPG

large_9b973980-4830-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

9e079d40-4830-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG 9e3786e0-4830-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

9d92e270-4830-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

large_9cb79da0-4830-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

large_9bd023d0-4830-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

large_9c727e50-4830-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

9c9855d0-4830-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

9ad6a8a0-4830-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG 9b0ab0f0-4830-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

9f158ad0-4830-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG 9f0bc6d0-4830-11e9-aa59-a7a0aeb3fd35.JPG

IMG_6142.JPG

9dc03400-4830-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG

Papad

Perched on a hill 11km from Jaipur and nestling among the Aravali Hills is the historic fort-palace of Amber.

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

Amber Fort is perhaps the most well-known fort in India. It gets its name from the small heritage town of Amber (also known as Amer) where it's situated, about 20 minutes northeast Jaipur. Rajput ruler Maharaja Man Singh I began constructing the fort in 1592. Successive rulers added to it and occupied it until Jaipur was built and the capital relocated there in 1727. Now, it's one of Jaipur's top tourist attractions.

The fort is part of a group of six hill forts in Rajasthan that were declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2013 (the others are Jaisalmer Fort, Kumbhalgarh, Chittorgarh, Ranthambore Fort, Gagron Fort and Amber Fort). Its architecture is a magnificent blend of Hindu and Mughal influences. Made out of sandstone and white marble, the fort complex consists of a series of courtyards, palaces, halls and gardens. The Sheesh Mahal (Mirror Palace) is widely regarded as the most beautiful part of it, with intricately carved, glittering walls and ceilings.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-palaces-and-forts-in-india-1539345

dfc926d0-4831-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG IMG_6145.JPG

db5f6410-4831-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG da0ea120-4831-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

de7863e0-4831-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

IMG_6148.JPG IMG_6150.JPG

IMG_6151.JPG

d92c0950-4831-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG dc005f00-4831-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

He is like the vendor in Udaipur selling chana jor garam. Made of flattened chick peas which is smashed into a disc when wet, sundried or roasted (ideally) and spiced with masalas, sold as a very popular street food.

It is the onion which he is peeling and going to chop. This is how most of the vendors chop or peel their veges when they have no space.

Ask Indian housewives, you would hardly see any chopping boards in kitchen as paring knife is used to chop all sort of veggies with both hands.

Chana jor garam is normally roasted with charcoal pot which just sits on the pile of chanas. As per your order, he will mix and toss it in a paper for you with onion, green chillies, lemon juice, chat masala, black salt and coriander leaves.

db5cf310-4831-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

Pagdi (Turban) is a Rajasthani headwear worn by men and made up of cotton (printed).

de6db580-4831-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

ddb0f530-4831-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

Papad

df156730-4831-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG de2ba370-4831-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

dfe9a720-4831-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

dec23e20-4831-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG IMG_6163.JPG

Being so late now, the elephants who took the tourists up to the fort in the morning were returning plus we had to endure the lengthy traffic jam. It was because of all the domestic Indian tourists visiting what was certainly the number 1 site on this part of the trip.

It took an hour from when I first saw the fort till the car reached the car park at the top of the fort itself. Quicker if we had walked!

With the traffic on the one way in stopping for such long periods of time, Push suggested we get out and first up was to see the Panna Meena Ka Kund stepwell near Kheri Gate. Not allowed to climb down the stairs.

I wish I had more time as I was told no photos, but I took some then later read this ….

Entry to the step well is officially free but be warned, the patrolling policeman will probably try to charge you 150 rupees to go inside. I found that the best way to avoid paying was to ask him lots of questions about the entry fee such as “Where is the price list?”, “Do you provide actual tickets?”, or “Can I have a receipt?” and he will soon be so frustrated that he will stop hassling you, leaving you to wander down the steps and take as many photographs as your heart desires.

http://www.manvsglobe.com/panna-meena-ka-kund-visit-jaipur-stepwell-baori/

While Push waited to see the car catching up, I quickly saw this one which was bigger and square compared to the rectangular shaped stepwell that I had seen in Delhi.

e026d730-4831-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG e0abbea0-4831-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

dd7a06b0-4831-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG d9284350-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

large_d95f31d0-4832-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

Popcorn

Then back into the car and not much further along it was out again so I could see the Jagat Shiromani Temple.

Jagat Shiromani is a Hindu temple situated in Amer, India. This temple is dedicated to the Hindu gods Meera bai, Krishna and Vishnu. It was constructed between 1599-1608 AD by Queen Kanakwati, who was the wife of King Man Singh 1st. The temple was built in the memory of their son Jagat Singh.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jagat_Shiromani_Temple,_Amer

dc04fd70-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

d7e5ff50-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

d9403820-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

d7136d10-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG d8520790-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

d6c76ff0-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

dd802bc0-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

A yell from Push saying that the car was approaching so that was it.

Two unexpected bonuses.

d5cd3170-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG d69b7df0-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

d5fc30b0-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG ddda0b90-4832-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

de5dba80-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG de36f8a0-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG

dc94ba50-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

Finally got to the top car park at 12.45pm / 12:45.

ddbb11e0-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

Push was well known by the Amber Fort staff, so it was using this personal knowledge and relationship plus using the “short cuts” he took me to just the highlights. He quickly picked up that I was a photographer and didn’t want to know the history so many thanks for this.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/jaipur-amber-fort-guide-4123752

If you arrive by car you will enter through the Chand Pol (Moon Gate) on the opposite side of Jaleb Chowk.

From Jaleb Chowk, an imposing stairway leads up to the main palace, but first it’s worth taking the steps just to the right, which lead to the small Siladevi Temple, with its gorgeous silver doors featuring repoussé (raised relief) work.

Heading back to the main stairway will take you up to the second courtyard and the Diwan-i-Am (Hall of Public Audience), which has a double row of columns, each topped by a capital in the shape of an elephant, and latticed galleries above.

The maharaja’s apartments are located around the third courtyard – you enter through the fabulous Ganesh Pol, decorated with beautiful frescoed arches. The Jai Mandir (Hall of Victory) is noted for its inlaid panels and multimirrored ceiling. Carved marble relief panels around the hall are fascinatingly delicate and quirky, depicting cartoon-like insects and sinuous flowers. Opposite the Jai Mandir is the Sukh Niwas(Hall of Pleasure), with an ivory-inlaid sandalwood door and a channel that once carried cooling water right through the room. From the Jai Mandir you can enjoy fine views from the palace ramparts over picturesque Maota Lake below.

The zenana (secluded women’s quarters) surrounds the fourth courtyard. The rooms were designed so that the maharaja could embark on his nocturnal visits to his wives’ and concubines’ respective chambers without the others knowing, as the chambers are independent but open onto a common corridor.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/attractions/amber-fort/a/poi-sig/1286368/1329231

d9e4dc90-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

d63430a0-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG dcf35510-4832-11e9-a239-e72b58b1a2ad.JPG

ddcd3a50-4832-11e9-bc19-171afc65271d.JPG IMG_6191.JPG

IMG_6192.JPG

04b809a0-4834-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG 036a53f0-4834-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

06f17ee0-4834-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG IMG_6198.JPG

089f55f0-4834-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG 02c3dac0-4834-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

0331ded0-4834-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

0631b150-4834-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG 083a79a0-4834-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

large_IMG_6205.JPG

large_056e1330-4834-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

042bcf30-4834-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG 08e18f10-4834-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

Push had done much of the restoration of the glass work here and showed me what he had done. Such craftsmanship.

5b65de20-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG IMG_6213.JPG

5b66c880-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG 58c7dab0-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

58f441e0-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG IMG_6225.JPG 5aec8f70-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

595d8b00-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG 5a570630-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

5a4dde70-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG 5873c740-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

c6ebf5d0-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG c8997ec0-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

ca0d0bf0-4835-11e9-bee8-d9a8c9849ea3.JPG cb73eef0-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

c8436f80-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG cbb42c40-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

c90bc890-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG IMG_6234.JPG

c9410960-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

IMG_6243.JPG ca6b3180-4835-11e9-bee8-d9a8c9849ea3.JPG

cb50af80-4835-11e9-bee8-d9a8c9849ea3.JPG

ca458110-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

cbb3de20-4835-11e9-bee8-d9a8c9849ea3.JPG c78e9e70-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

IMG_6248.JPG c9869de0-4835-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

c616f290-4835-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG c1993d30-4836-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

c1a5c050-4836-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

c47952b0-4836-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG c3a38c20-4836-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG

large_c373c990-4836-11e9-81af-f11dcaaf42c9.JPG

c56698e0-4836-11e9-9625-35c6750e84d4.JPG c36dd620-4836-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

c51d0cc0-4836-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG c2a8ff80-4836-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG

c2573600-4836-11e9-81af-f11dcaaf42c9.JPG

da4b7450-4837-11e9-8a1e-87485db49c4b.JPG da62f3f0-4837-11e9-81af-f11dcaaf42c9.JPG

db333c40-4837-11e9-bf93-0d3bd572b88f.JPG

dae76630-4837-11e9-81af-f11dcaaf42c9.JPG db51e7d0-4837-11e9-81af-f11dcaaf42c9.JPG

With the balloon ride taking so long plus the really heavy traffic, my time here was limited so a return visit in the future would certainly not go astray.

Posted by bruceontour 01:17 Archived in India Tagged jaipur amber_fort stepwell panna_meena_ka_kund_stepwell panna_meena_ka_kund jagat_shiromani_temple jagat_shiromani chana_jor_garam Comments (0)

52 ~ Hawa Mahal = Palace of the Winds : Jaipur

“Express” path bypassing the many local tourists


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Back at 10am / 10:00 and after a hasty change out of my layers of merino, a quick breakfast left at 10.30am / 10:30 for Hawa Mahal also known as the Palace of the Winds.

IMG_6068.JPG

IMG_6069.JPG IMG_6070.JPG

e3855dc0-482c-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

e22865d0-482c-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

The intricate and fascinating facade of the Palace of the Winds is probably Jaipur's most recognized building. Constructed in 1799, it has five floors that contain rows of small windows and screens. Wind used to flow through the openings, giving the palace its name. However, the wind has now gone from the Wind Palace as most of the windows have been sealed shut. Legend has it that the palace, which overlooks the main street of Jaipur's lively Old City, was built so that the women of the royal household could watch the streets below without being observed. A panoramic view can be had from the top of the building.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-jaipur-attractions-1539207

http://www.hawa-mahal.com/

From behind it was a climb up the five stories to the top. Again, it was Push's personal relationship with the local staff on duty that we had an “express” path bypassing the many local tourists who were queuing to go up.

e6dfac50-482c-11e9-8d4b-1b14111088c7.JPG e2f72780-482c-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

e297f080-482c-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG e48e9060-482c-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

IMG_6079.JPG e510b8b0-482c-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

d83215c0-482d-11e9-afac-3fce6d64891d.JPG

e75fd8d0-482c-11e9-a94a-77c331358f88.JPG

large_e759be50-482c-11e9-8d4b-1b14111088c7.JPG

d6c82580-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG d376b090-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG

d2da7090-482d-11e9-afac-3fce6d64891d.JPG d7ef6770-482d-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

d81d0720-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG d822fa90-482d-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

d6f48cb0-482d-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

IMG_6098.JPG d4254010-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG

e3f78080-482c-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG d2f01b70-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPGIMG_6082.JPG

d238d960-482d-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

e29cab70-482c-11e9-a94a-77c331358f88.JPG e2349ad0-482c-11e9-afac-3fce6d64891d.JPG

e2892370-482c-11e9-afac-3fce6d64891d.JPG d17932e0-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG

IMG_6100.JPG

d23fde40-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG d14d8f00-482d-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG d189d4b0-482d-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG

d2ee94d0-482d-11e9-a3b7-fbfe197119bc.JPG d253db70-482d-11e9-afac-3fce6d64891d.JPG

large_d4f38c90-482d-11e9-a47e-af9cce9bdbb6.JPG

Then down and a walk along the front of Hawa Mahal as seen in the tourist brochures. The elaborate façade contains 953 small casements or to me windows with shutters in a huge curve. Each had its own balcony and crowning arch.

ae5bdef0-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG bd564080-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG

c1769e30-482f-11e9-a910-b9cd548df135.JPG

large_be61e420-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG

IMG_6116.JPG

c04d6070-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG c07f9400-482f-11e9-a910-b9cd548df135.JPG

large_bf224df0-482f-11e9-a910-b9cd548df135.JPG

c18ee120-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG c0a03b60-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG

bc69e4b0-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG bbbae000-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG

IMG_6126.JPG

IMG_6125.JPG c0220ab0-482f-11e9-a910-b9cd548df135.JPG bcbfa5d0-482f-11e9-9029-e5f71989ad4b.JPG

It was then off at 11.50am / 11:50 to see Amber Fort.

Posted by bruceontour 00:10 Archived in India Tagged jaipur hawa_maha palace_of_the_winds Comments (0)

51 ~ "Up, Up and Away" in my beautiful balloon : Jaipur

Day 14 : Children madly running down the roads & across the fields trying to follow the balloon


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Both alarms were set for 4.45am / 04:45 with a 5.15am / 05:15 pick up. Another couple from the hotel had also booked this hot air balloon trip so the 3 of us were taken 60 minutes through Jaipur streets still fast asleep and out north towards town of Chandwaji.

"Up, Up and Away" is a 1967 song written by Jimmy Webb and recorded by the 5th Dimension was certainly in my mind as I waited for lift off.
“Would you like to ride in my beautiful balloon
Would you like to ride in my beautiful balloon
We could float among the stars together, you and I
For we can fly we can fly
Up, up and away”

This scheduled one hour balloon ride was not cheap but was to be my luxury treat for this trip. NZ$425 / US$290 / just over 20,000 rupees.

http://www.skywaltz.com/

It was my second hot air balloon experience having done a low level one in Cambodia back in 2012.

http://v2.travelark.org/travel-blog-entry/bruceontour/9/1356219664

Three balloons today and I was in the smallest one with just 8 passengers. The largest one took just over 20 people in its wicker basket. Having sent a few days earlier my weight for load distribution, it was liftoff in the Chomu Sub-District at 7.10am / 07:10.

Being out in the open I was prepared for the cold with beanie, silk scarf, 3 layers of short and long sleeve merino tops, sleeveless fleece vest and an outer wind shell jacket. Yes, it was 5C / 40 F but I certainly did not feel the cold at all.

Yes ... lots of photos / videos ...

IMG_5912.JPG

7bbc5e90-43cd-11e9-8d5e-d1ff1114b32a.JPG

7a8405a0-43cd-11e9-b280-179112e43cbc.JPG

7b145ec0-43cd-11e9-b280-179112e43cbc.JPG 7aa37480-43cd-11e9-ab55-7d49a73a5fd3.JPG

large_76337030-43cd-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

7a8e17c0-43cd-11e9-8d5e-d1ff1114b32a.JPG

IMG_5931.JPG

78d01410-43cd-11e9-b280-179112e43cbc.JPG

large_76ccf110-43cd-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

Our Spanish Captain Arturo

7684c480-43cd-11e9-b280-179112e43cbc.JPG

76be9930-43cd-11e9-b280-179112e43cbc.JPG IMG_5942.JPG

7c844270-43cd-11e9-ab55-7d49a73a5fd3.JPG

79775090-43cd-11e9-8d5e-d1ff1114b32a.JPG

787e71a0-43cd-11e9-8d5e-d1ff1114b32a.JPG

IMG_5948.JPG

7b78c5e0-43cd-11e9-ab55-7d49a73a5fd3.JPG

77588f40-43cd-11e9-b280-179112e43cbc.JPG

7adc10b0-43cd-11e9-ab55-7d49a73a5fd3.JPG

7847aa30-43cd-11e9-ab55-7d49a73a5fd3.JPG 12fca7f0-43cf-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

775fbb30-43cd-11e9-8d5e-d1ff1114b32a.JPG

193202f0-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

1475da70-43cf-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG 1437c000-43cf-11e9-a33b-750470f4786a.JPG

19721930-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

14450670-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

195c4740-43cf-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

13b98f50-43cf-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

18b92970-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

15ef8220-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG IMG_5964.JPG

17289e60-43cf-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

1712f380-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

14e42ca0-43cf-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG 13766bd0-43cf-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

14ad6530-43cf-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

16609370-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

14aca1e0-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

14b617c0-43cf-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG 15ac85b0-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

13f75ba0-43cf-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

The sun had not risen above the far horizon as we gathered height.

154b79f0-43cf-11e9-80c3-2daeb2d81d47.JPG

18b95080-43cf-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

1d114e10-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

Such peace and the low lying fog blanketed the fields below.

152ad290-43cf-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG 56e6b6d0-43d0-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

572c2440-43d0-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

57033f80-43d0-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG 1ddf4c70-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

1f534ed0-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

20ae23e0-43d1-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG IMG_5986.JPG

1fb60840-43d1-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

IMG_5988.JPG 1ee6d160-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

1d114e10-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

1f76dc60-43d1-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG d6e616e0-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

The local were outside their houses waving at us as we drifted above them.

d8723520-43d1-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

d89f86b0-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

d793e310-43d1-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

db856890-43d1-11e9-96e9-5bc79578e3d0.JPG

d77844c0-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

d9578c10-43d1-11e9-96e9-5bc79578e3d0.JPG

d6b765c0-43d1-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

IMG_6000.JPG

IMG_6001.JPG

IMG_6002.JPG

IMG_6004.JPG df239df0-43d1-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

dfae51c0-43d1-11e9-96e9-5bc79578e3d0.JPG

d987c3d0-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG da692320-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

ded752b0-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

da733540-43d1-11e9-96e9-5bc79578e3d0.JPG

df0c4560-43d1-11e9-96e9-5bc79578e3d0.JPG

ddcf7fa0-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG dc601120-43d1-11e9-96e9-5bc79578e3d0.JPG

dfee19e0-43d1-11e9-a766-2b7627811ba7.JPG

df61df70-43d1-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG
f8848ba0-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

fa11e260-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

fca7f690-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

8e75d140-6409-11e9-8026-65421c843881.JPG

fd22f2f0-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

fb2f6050-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPGfc3efb90-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

IMG_6025.JPG

fada8990-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG IMG_6027.JPG

fd3da6e0-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG fcd4fa00-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

Soon it was time to come down and our Spanish Captain Arturo spotted a field and at 8.17am / 08:17 touch down.

f7027f80-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

f6b9ddc0-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG IMG_6032.JPG

f5654a40-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG f46602b0-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG f4ebfb90-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

f6559db0-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

f6b6a970-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG f60051c0-43d2-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

IMG_6043.JPG f608dd40-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

f9009970-43d2-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

Unfortunately, it had no vehicle access so with the many children and adults surrounding the balloon it was lift off again. We had over 2 hours of gas so no problems here.

So, at 8.28am / 08:28 lift off and with the children madly running down the roads and across the fields trying to follow the balloon, it was a real unexpected bonus to spend more time above the countryside.

5062a2c0-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG 50cc12f0-43d4-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

IMG_6048.JPG

4ad54790-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

50d19130-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

IMG_6051.JPG

4c0deea0-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

51b69a00-43d4-11e9-b3f9-71c23f3adb13.JPG

51a2eaf0-43d4-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

Second touchdown at 8.50am / 08:50 and landed in the Shahpura Sub-District.

No issues with access for the support vehicles who were closely following us.

4ab90d00-43d4-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG 4afa0da0-43d4-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

4ba96070-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG IMG_6057.JPG

4cc92850-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG 4d27c310-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

4d8f5e80-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

Certificates handed out and a group photo before being taken back to Jaipur late!

large_4c4a3450-43d4-11e9-b6b4-717bb792b88e.JPG

4de594d0-43d4-11e9-bfef-ef7d637cda34.JPG

Was initially told that we would be back at 9.30am / 09:30.

Twenty minutes later leaving at 9.09am / 09:09, thankfully the traffic wasn’t that bad as we headed back into Jaipur.

Posted by bruceontour 00:08 Archived in India Tagged jaipur hot_air_balloon skywaltz Comments (0)

50 ~ Colourful, cheerful, shopping mayhem Bapu Bazar, Jaipur

No experience like no other!


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Back into the car and off to Bapu Bazar and the start of another crowded bustling walk in amongst the locals.

IMG_5731.JPG

IMG_5737.JPG

acca2260-4300-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG

IMG_5735.JPG IMG_5736.JPG

IMG_5738.JPG

IMG_5741.JPG

adc01b20-4300-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

b0d4d530-4300-11e9-a3bd-a7b1a24662a5.JPG

b0164020-4300-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG

IMG_5743.JPG IMG_5744.JPG

ae359940-4300-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG ad681010-4300-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

IMG_5751.JPG

b01ea490-4300-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

IMG_5740.JPG

ab33a3e0-4300-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG ace99140-4300-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

large_ab19b340-4300-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

IMG_5757.JPG

IMG_5758.JPG

af5eaff0-4300-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG 7d77f580-4302-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

IMG_5760.JPG 7cd39f30-4302-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

IMG_5763.JPG IMG_5764.JPG

7da85450-4302-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

80222df0-4302-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG 7f4eb150-4302-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

Walked along part of Chand Pole Bazar Rd. This market is famous for its artificial jewellery, bright bandhej / bandhani saree and suits, leather juttis, colourful Mojris (footwear), silver and artificial jewellery, gems, lac handmade bangles in vibrant shades, traditional hand block print fabrics, colourful bed sheets and rajais (quilts) etc.

Tiny shops half spilling out into the narrow footpath. Shops were on pavements, mobile carts, street vendors, mega buildings, small ones tucked in corners ... shops galore or shoppers’ paradise … shops, people, cars, buses, rickshaws, autos, cows, dogs and of course the shoppers were everywhere.

It was certainly colourful and cheerful mayhem! It was an experience like no other!

7e90df90-4302-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG

7f2cf880-4302-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG 7e9880b0-4302-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG 82bb9d80-4302-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG

IMG_5773.JPG

IMG_5772.JPG IMG_5774.JPG

7f475e50-4302-11e9-9193-af74aeadddfc.JPG IMG_5776.JPG

7e65b0e0-4302-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

IMG_5782.JPG 81afabc0-4302-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

IMG_5783.JPG

81d50e10-4302-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

81747780-4302-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG 82b42370-4302-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

a5b518f0-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG a4f7e370-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

a4123e60-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG a564fd20-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

654a0230-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

a56a0630-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG 646c2550-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

9edc7910-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

IMG_5797.JPG

a17e7420-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

IMG_5798.JPG 9e6cee60-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

9f550470-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG 9f917130-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

IMG_5799.JPG

a5c8c800-4304-11e9-a430-87adfff5cbbf.JPG a4f79550-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

9fdea6d0-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

a136bcc0-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

IMG_5805.JPG

large_9fd72cc0-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

a3219cd0-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

a41f84d0-4304-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

a5c7b690-4304-11e9-8559-25a88c301ed7.JPG

7b7b48e0-4307-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG IMG_5814.JPG

large_IMG_5815.JPG

IMG_5816.JPG IMG_5817.JPG

IMG_5818.JPG IMG_5819.JPG

IMG_5820.JPG IMG_5821.JPG

IMG_5823.JPG 7dbde5e0-4307-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

79fda990-4307-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG 7cfd2df0-4307-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

7d6872e0-4307-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

7f833c90-4307-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG IMG_5833.JPG

7f216d80-4307-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

7fe13b10-4307-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 7fe336e0-4307-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

7f8c6450-4307-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

7fde54e0-4307-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

7f8e3910-4307-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

7eca9af0-4307-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG 5f114f00-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

7ea69830-4307-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

608b6be0-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG 60ecc5c0-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

611a6570-4308-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

671157e0-4308-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG 5eff4da0-4308-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

large_5fb1d4c0-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

61907fd0-4308-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

67689fa0-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG 67763430-4308-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

large_6006d290-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

IMG_5852.JPG

61c2b360-4308-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG 646a7ad0-4308-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

6330c250-4308-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

669fd160-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

65e42280-4308-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

6717e790-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

67a9c750-4308-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 64eb6aa0-4308-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

619cb4d0-4308-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

660b80a0-4308-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG IMG_5866.JPG

71c87500-4309-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

760115a0-4309-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG 7089b370-4309-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

768fe820-4309-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

75f2bdc0-4309-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

762b0bd0-4309-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

76ec8710-4309-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

Is it a lamp standard?

This is a wedding lamp, normally used in the procession.

72931800-4309-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 71907510-4309-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 714e3bf0-4309-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

Then nearby Push showed me some of the glass work that he was currently restoring in a haveli that was also under restoration.

77cf9410-4309-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG IMG_5881.JPG

IMG_5883.JPG 7215d1b0-4309-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

Lastly, it was the inevitable jewellery factory with the … you guess it, shop at the end. No thank you.

743c3420-4309-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG IMG_5886.JPG

IMG_5887.JPG 7318e9d0-4309-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG IMG_5889.JPG

748cc520-4309-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG 74faa220-4309-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG

Back to the hotel at 5pm / 17:00.

From my room there was a view down into the neighbouring shopping centre.

6f7f52e0-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

Plus, what about the large window between the bedroom and bathroom?

75c19ba0-4309-11e9-95ee-594c10cc7ac5.JPG 6fa9be40-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

7039c940-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

Got a 360-degree view over the city from the hotel roof top swimming pool.

7097a0b0-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 6da9cf90-430a-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

6fef79d0-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 6b9e6f30-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

large_6d1dbc30-430a-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

Then back down on my 4th floor and took the sunset pictures from behind the glass window.

6f4a1210-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

70ddd170-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 70c0d390-430a-11e9-8faf-65f79bc408f6.JPG

6e8f4d90-430a-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG

6a493f70-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

6d0949d0-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG 700fd310-430a-11e9-8faf-65f79bc408f6.JPG

6f29dfe0-430a-11e9-b44f-a1c03d012b1f.JPG 6ac79730-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

IMG_5910.JPG IMG_5911.JPG

Sun finally set in the distance at 5.40pm / 16:40.

Dinner in the hotel restaurant = Gosht biryani - Prime cuts of lamb cooked with basmati rice, finished in dum served with burrani raita 525 rupees / NZ$10.60 / US$7.30.
Plus GST and a tip came to 650 rupees / NZ$13.20 / US$9.10.
Won’t talk about the slack service when I asked for the bill.

6c5d2b50-430a-11e9-94b0-b795611ddadf.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 22:10 Archived in India Tagged jaipur bapu_bazar Comments (0)

49 ~ Ganges water to unclean London! City Palace : Jaipur

World’s largest single silver item


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Next door was City Palace.

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

Situated at the center of the Old City of Jaipur, the City Palace Complex was built mainly between 1729 and 1732 by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh II. He had been successfully ruling from nearby Amber Fort but increasing population and water shortage made him decide to relocate his capital to Jaipur in 1727.

The royal family still lives in the Chandra Mahal part of the palace (their family flag flies atop it when the Maharaja is in residence), while the remainder has been converted into the Maharaja Sawai Man Singh II museum. For a hefty fee (2,500 rupees for foreigners and 2,000 rupees for Indians), you can take the Royal Grandeur tour through the inner quarters of the Chandra Mahal. Otherwise you'll have to be content with exploring the rest of the palace.

The most eye-catching part of it is Pitam Niwas Chowk, the interior courtyard that leads to the Chandra Mahal. It has four beautifully painted doors, or gates, representing the four seasons and dedicated to Hindu gods Vishnu, Shiva, Ganesh, and Goddess Devi (the mother goddess). The peacock motifs on the doorway of Peacock Gate are particularly stunning and widely photographed.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-palaces-and-forts-in-india-1539345

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

Upon visiting the magnificent City Palace, it's easy to see that the royal family of Jaipur was one of the richest in India. The palace's huge complex of courtyards, gardens, and buildings blends both Rajasthani and Mughal architecture. The royal family lives still lives there, in the graceful Chandra Mahal. It's possible to access the private rooms, with a personal guide, for an additional cost. Also inside the City Palace complex is a museum, art gallery, and interesting displays of royal costumes and old Indian weapons.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-jaipur-attractions-1539207

https://royaljaipur.in/

efb187f0-42f9-11e9-b479-676ad142562b.JPG IMG_5655.JPG IMG_5657.JPG

IMG_5659.JPG ef819e50-42f9-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

Rajendra Pol

f1a875f0-42f9-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG IMG_5661.JPG

IMG_5658.JPG

Mubarak Mahal – Welcome Palace

IMG_5663.JPG

IMG_5666.JPG IMG_5665.JPG

Rajendra Pol

IMG_5667.JPG

Mubarak Mahal – Welcome Palace

ef333030-42f9-11e9-b479-676ad142562b.JPG

IMG_5668.JPG IMG_5669.JPG IMG_5672.JPG

IMG_5673.JPG

IMG_5674.JPG

IMG_5675.JPG

IMG_5676.JPG

2ebf3c20-42fb-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG IMG_5678.JPG

IMG_5680.JPG 317c6050-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG

Chandra Mahal

30d041d0-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG

2fd14860-42fb-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG 32987eb0-42fb-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

Chandra Mahal

359f07f0-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG

34d3efc0-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG 35dc8620-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG

30818590-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG

IMG_5695.JPG 34fa8a90-42fb-11e9-944d-cf646094823f.JPG

318e61b0-42fb-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

349efd10-42fb-11e9-944d-cf646094823f.JPG

33ec4ee0-42fb-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

32e69eb0-42fb-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

32f4a870-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG

IMG_5700.JPG

The most unique feature are the two huge silver water containers and are the world’s largest single silver items. These were used to transport Ganges water to unclean London!

33f59db0-42fb-11e9-8eac-73f881930c8b.JPG e82d41f0-42fd-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

2e8d2fa0-42fb-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG e275c980-42fd-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

IMG_5707.JPG

IMG_5708.JPG e55a72e0-42fd-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

IMG_5715.JPG

e41cc2c0-42fd-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG e3c505d0-42fd-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

IMG_5714.JPG

e3814610-42fd-11e9-a551-451a6e6a77f9.JPG

e3867630-42fd-11e9-a709-9b6ffbc2ba37.JPG

IMG_5717.JPG e8551540-42fd-11e9-b7cc-6b32a51c7e0a.JPG e82bbb50-42fd-11e9-8d67-c3f284302634.JPG

IMG_5720.JPG

e9d9b970-42fd-11e9-b7cc-6b32a51c7e0a.JPG IMG_5722.JPG IMG_5723.JPG

IMG_5724.JPG IMG_5725.JPG

IMG_5730.JPG IMG_5726.JPG

ea1dc750-42fd-11e9-8d67-c3f284302634.JPG

IMG_5728.JPG

Was 3pm / 15:00 when I was finished here.

Posted by bruceontour 22:52 Archived in India Tagged jaipur city_palace Comments (0)

48 ~ Modern day sculpture park or ancient Observatory?Jaipur

Day 13 : Jantar Mantar Observatory was a real surprise


View India 18 - 19 on bruceontour's travel map.

Another 9am / 09:00 departure so there was after another double breakfast time for a walk around the resort taking the day time images in the previous entry.

IMG_5542.JPG 2e9bbc60-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

2c3347e0-423c-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG

320f8660-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG IMG_5543.JPG

2b580310-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG 2be91f80-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

2c336ef0-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

2e9ddf40-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG 2b866610-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

Took just 2.5 hours to get to the Pink City of Jaipur.

Surrounded on three sides by the rugged Aravali hills, Jaipur is the picturesque capital of Rajasthan. It takes its name from the prince, soldier and astronomer Jai Singh II who moved his capital here in 1727. Jaipur is notable for its distinctive pink-orange colouring. The whole of the old city, including many fine palaces and buildings was constructed from solid blocks of sandstone or faced with the same stone. But it was only in 1853 that it gained its famous title, the ‘Pink City’ - it was painted pink for the first time in honour of a visit from Prince Albert.

2d5c3780-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG 2e019f40-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG

2cc093c0-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG 2c858690-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG

323e85a0-423c-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG

Check into the Fortune Metropolitan, a 4 star hotel.

https://www.fortunehotels.in/jaipur-fortune-select-metropolitan.dh.41

A short break before the 1pm / 13:00 departure for the city tour. So, it was next door into the adjourning shopping centre to see what was there.

Pushpendra (Push) was my local guide for Jaipur. With his pink baseball cap and tall stature, he was really easy to spot.

2f16dfd0-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG

Push

Then off to Jantar Mantar Observatory.

3195e990-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG IMG_5558.JPG

2ff69170-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG 2ddeadf0-423c-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG

IMG_5567.JPG 2e180d70-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

314fdfe0-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG 30588790-423c-11e9-b539-4580db395efc.JPG

32091dc0-423c-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

IMG_5568.JPG

c03bbed0-423d-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG IMG_5570.JPG

b0bc7ad0-57ff-11e9-87cd-03b9c89b86da.JPG

All these small chemists / pharmacies opposite the hospital

c0e80460-423d-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG

IMG_5572.JPG

large_bbb35080-423d-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG

IMG_5575.JPG

IMG_5577.JPG

IMG_5576.JPG

bc48d9c0-423d-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG bb7499d0-423d-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

c0c8e3a0-423d-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG

be729790-423d-11e9-aa32-b34c480b6a80.JPG

bf2c98c0-423d-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG

be9d5110-423d-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG bfca8670-423d-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG

The open air Jantar Mantar Observatory was a real surprise. As one brochure said it was more like a modern day sculpture park than an ancient Observatory.

Here is the link to Tripsavvy:

Jantar Mantar, built by King Jai Singh II between 1727 and 1734, literally means "calculation instrument". More than just a curious collection of sculptures, each structure at the intriguing Jantar Mantar observatory has a specialized astronomical function. There are 14 structures in total, which measure time, predict eclipses, and track stars. The most impressive one is the huge Samrat Yantra sundial. At a height of 90 feet (27 meters), it has a shadow that moves roughly the width of a person's hand every minute. It's a profound display of how quickly time does in fact go!

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-jaipur-attractions-1539207

Push gave me the briefing, showed me the best places to take photos and then for the next 30 minutes let me loose to snap away.

c0531760-423d-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG bd829240-423d-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

bd377f80-423d-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG c1668330-423d-11e9-9c29-bb6b98f7cc68.JPG

Laghu Samrat Yantra

IMG_5592.JPG 258368e0-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG

1f81c810-4240-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG 20e632b0-4243-11e9-81f3-af06e4639ff8.JPG

IMG_5600.JPG 20cdf720-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG

2483fa40-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG 204da390-4240-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG

Samrat Yantra

207f13d0-4240-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG 24425d60-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG 23ef5b60-4240-11e9-8049-db075384fae5.JPG

2135b9a0-4240-11e9-8049-db075384fae5.JPG

large_21c30580-4240-11e9-8049-db075384fae5.JPG

Samrat Yantra

1ece2f80-4240-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG 22dfc020-4240-11e9-8049-db075384fae5.JPG

24ead260-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG 218a1b30-4240-11e9-8049-db075384fae5.JPG

Jai Prakash Yantra

20b82530-4240-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG

1ff99020-4240-11e9-84e6-61b2525c2358.JPG

230b8b10-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG 6972c460-4240-11e9-aa56-a7914e00c9b0.JPG 24b71830-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG

Narivalaya Yantra

25bf3960-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG 23f01eb0-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG

219b8050-4240-11e9-a74b-d7b1d8cfcfef.JPG

2461c4e0-4243-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG

IMG_5623.JPG 252fea50-4243-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG 22296110-4243-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG

Laghu Samrat Yantra

1e63cd90-4243-11e9-a2c4-31ef6414ce3d.JPG 1e19a530-4243-11e9-a2c4-31ef6414ce3d.JPG

IMG_5622.JPG

IMG_5630.JPG 1d40f870-4243-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG

Chakra Yantra

20416730-4243-11e9-81f3-af06e4639ff8.JPG 24a18d00-4243-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG

IMG_5634.JPG 20f0e110-4243-11e9-a875-a985ce2dcd87.JPG

IMG_5636.JPG 25e72c60-4243-11e9-81dd-5d2b8c68434b.JPG 20796720-4243-11e9-81f3-af06e4639ff8.JPG

Ram Yantra

1ef27900-4243-11e9-81f3-af06e4639ff8.JPG

205cde70-4243-11e9-a875-a985ce2dcd87.JPG 24f3a4a0-4243-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG

Ram Yantra

250f9110-4243-11e9-a875-a985ce2dcd87.JPG 23e8eb60-4243-11e9-86bc-074e23c1e9f3.JPG

IMG_5644.JPG IMG_5645.JPG

IMG_5648.JPG

de7e0180-4244-11e9-81f3-af06e4639ff8.JPG IMG_5649.JPG

large_de7268c0-4244-11e9-a875-a985ce2dcd87.JPG

Papadom is a term used mostly in South India where as in north they just call it as papad.

You see a lot of papad's being sold in Rajasthan because of the heat. Normally papad's are made at home and sundried on sarees or old bed sheets.

The papad variety starts from Dal (lentil), chawal (rice), chana (chick pea), sabu dana (tapioca), hari mirch (green chilli) ... and so on.

dd52a0e0-4244-11e9-81f3-af06e4639ff8.JPG

IMG_5652.JPG IMG_5653.JPG

Posted by bruceontour 23:40 Archived in India Tagged jaipur pink_city jantar_mantar_observatory jantar_mantar Comments (0)

(Entries 1 - 15 of 138) Page [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 »