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1024 ways to reach the roof but only 1 way to come back

Day 11 Varanasi > Lucknow

It was pitch black as we had to get up at some ungodly hour in readiness for the short transfer in pea soup fog to the nearby railway station to catch the morning 5am / 05:00 Varanasi - Lucknow Intercity train.

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Got into Lucknow at 12.30pm / 12:30.

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Lunch at The Mughal’s Dastarkhwan – House of Mughlai delicacies. Kebab Platter 475 rupee / NZ$10.00 / US$7.30, fresh lime soda 60 rupee / NZ$1.30 / US$.90, mughai paratha 24 rupee / NZ$.50 / US$.40, mineral water 20 rupee / NZ$.40 / US$.30 = Total 579 rupee / NZ$12.20 / US$8.90.

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Top Boli
Seekh
Bottom left Galawati
Bottom right Shami

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On route to Bara Imambara

Rumi Darwaza / Roomi Gate

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The Rumi Darwaza in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, is an imposing gateway which was built under the patronage of Nawab Asaf-Ud-daula in 1784. It is an example of Awadhi architecture. The Rumi Darwaza, which stands sixty feet tall, was modeled (1784) after the Sublime Porte (Bab-iHümayun) in Istanbul. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumi_Darwaza

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Bara Imambara

Visited the famous Shia Muslim shrine with its ornate Mughal architecture and number 1 attraction in Lucknow. Yes, this massive shrine is a striking sight to behold and deserves it’s number 1 status.

Bara Imambara is an imambara complex in Lucknow, India, built by Asaf-ud-Daula, Nawab of Awadh, in 1784. It is also called the Asafi Imambara. Bara means big, and an imambara is a shrine built by Shia Muslims for the purpose of Azadari. The Bara Imambara is among the grandest buildings of Lucknow.

The complex also includes the large Asfi mosque, the bhul-bhulaiya (the labyrinth), and bowli, a step well with running water. Two imposing gateways lead to the main hall. It is said that there are 1024 ways to reach the terrace but only one to come back. It is an accidental architecture.

The architecture of the complex reflects the maturation of ornamented Mughal design, namely the Badshahi Mosque - it is one of the last major projects not incorporating any European elements or the use of iron. The main imambara consists of a large vaulted central chamber containing the tomb of Asaf-ud-Daula. At 50 by 16 meters and over 15 meters tall, it has no beams supporting the ceiling and is one of the largest such arched constructions in the world. There are eight surrounding chambers built to different roof heights, permitting the space above these to be reconstructed as a three-dimensional labyrinth with passages interconnecting with each other through 489 identical doorways. This part of the building, and often the whole complex, may be referred to as the Bhulbhulaya. Known as a popular attraction, it is possibly the only existing maze in India and came about unintentionally to support the weight of the building which is constructed on marshy land. Asaf-ud-Daula also erected the 18 meter / 59 foot high Rumi Darwaza, just outside. This portal, embellished with lavish decorations, was the Imambara's west facing entrance.

The design of the Imambara was obtained through a competitive process. The winner was a Delhi architect Kifayatullah, who also lies buried in the main hall of the Imambara. It is another unique aspect of the building that the sponsor and the architect lie buried beside each other. The roof of Imambara is made up from the rice husk which make this Imambara a unique building.

There is also a blocked tunnel passageway which, according to legends, leads through a mile-long underground passage to a location near the Gomti river. Other passages are rumoured to lead to Faizabad (the former seat of power of the Nawabs), Allahabad, Agra and even to Delhi. They exist but have been sealed after a period of long disuse as well as fears over the disappearance of people who had reportedly gone missing, while exploring but still the reality has not been checked. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bara_Imambara

http://www.lucknow.org.uk/tourist-attractions/bara-imambara.html

https://www.tornosindia.com/asafi-imambara/

https://www.roughguides.com/destinations/asia/india/uttar-pradesh/lucknow/bara-imambara/

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Hans, Sally, Joe, Bruce, Robyn, Ngaire, Tova, Ken

Hans, Sally, Joe, Bruce, Robyn, Ngaire, Tova, Ken

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=Bara+Imambara&tbm=isch

The highlight was wandering around the labyrinth with the 1024 ways to reach the roof terrace but only one to come back that if it wasn’t for the guide I would still be there trying to find my way out!

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Bruce, Ken, Robyn, Hans, Joe, Tova, Ngaire, Sally

Bruce, Ken, Robyn, Hans, Joe, Tova, Ngaire, Sally

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Our local guide

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&biw=1396&bih=668&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=lgm6WsOGK8GZ0gSV7peoAQ&q=labyrinth+lucknow&oq=lab+lucknow&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.0i7i30k1l2.89771.90550.0.92747.3.3.0.0.0.0.197.393.0j2.2.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..1.2.393...0i8i7i30k1.0.u0H576DOIpM

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Next door was the bouli / royal well.

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Hans

Hans

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=bouli+lucknow&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiokNSck4zaAhVEn5QKHQj_CCIQ_AUICigB&biw=1396&bih=668

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Rumi Darwaza / Roomi Gate

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Dinner was supposed to be “street” food. To me it wasn’t but going to a fast food outlet – Royal Hut where I choose the pao bhaji for 110 rupee / NZ$2.30 / US$1.70.

The dish originated in the 1850s as a fast lunchtime dish for textile mill workers in Mumbai. Pav bhaji was later served at restaurants throughout the city. Pav bhaji is now offered at outlets from simple hand carts to formal restaurants in India and abroad.

Pav bhaji has many variations in ingredients and garnishes, but is essentially a spiced mixture of mashed vegetables in a thick gravy served hot with a soft white bread roll, usually cooked on a flat griddle (tava).

Variations on pav bhaji include:
• Cheese pav bhaji, with cheese on top of the bhaji
• Fried pav bhaji, with the pav tossed in the bhaji
• Paneer pav bhaji, with paneer cheese in the bhaji
• Mushroom pav bhaji, with mushrooms in the bhaji
• Khada pav bhaji, with vegetable chunks in the bhaji
• Jain pav bhaji, without onions and garlic and with plantains instead of potatoes
• Kolhapuri pav bhaji, using a spice mix common in Kolhapur
• White pav bhaji, with no garam masala or no chilli powder. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pav_bhaji

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Then at Naturelo natural ice cream the desert of chikoo ice cream 140 rupee / NZ$2.90 / US$2.20 ended this day.

https://www.facebook.com/natureloicecreams/

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I had in Mumbai at Taj Ice Cream their chikoo ice cream.

But what is Chikoo?

Chikoo, most commonly known as 'Sapota' in India, is a very familiar fruit. Chikoo is also called as Naseberry, Mud Apples, and Sapodilla Plum. Chikoo is a delicate brown fruit which tastes sweet and yummy. Chikoo is scientifically known as 'Sapodilla.' It comes from the Sapotaceae family in Central America.

https://mavcure.com/health-benefits-uses-chikoo-sapodilla-fruit-juice/

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Posted by bruceontour 23:58 Archived in India Tagged bara_imambara

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