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Market & Temples Tour

15:30 / 3.30pm
Meeting Point
- Regal Cinema
Reality Tours Guide = Nano

This is what Reality Tours said …

Explore the bustling markets of South Mumbai and learn about the city’s rich history.

Mumbai's wide streets and narrow lanes are alive with activity. In front of colonial buildings, alongside temples, and everywhere in between, vendors shout from carts selling everything from colourful birds and flowers to traditional Indian clothes and food. We'll guide you through the chaos and introduce you to Mumbai's must-see markets such as Crawford Market and Mangaldas Market as well as some lesser known ones such as Flower Alley. Along the way we’ll also visit some of the oldest lanes in Mumbai and their most famous temples.

http://realitytoursandtravel.com/market-tour.php

Crawford Market ~ Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Market

Crawford Market, Marathi: महात्मा ज्योतिबा फुले मंडई (officially Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Mandai Marathi: क्रॉफर्ड मार्केट) is one of South Mumbai's most famous markets. It was named after Arthur Crawford, the first Municipal Commissioner of the city. The Market was later named after Mahatma Jotirao Phule after a long struggle by the President of Mahatma Phule Smarak Samiti, Mukundraoji Bhujbal Patil. The market is situated opposite the Mumbai Police headquarters, just north of Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus railway station and west of the J.J. flyover at a busy intersection.

The market houses a wholesale fruit, vegetable and poultry market. One end of the market is a pet store. Different varieties of dogs, cats, and birds can be found in this area. Also, endangered species are illegally sold there.

Most of the sellers inside the market sell imported items such as foods, cosmetics, household and gift items. It was the main wholesale market for fruits in Mumbai until March 1996, when the wholesale traders were relocated to Navi Mumbai (New Bombay).

In 1882, the building was the first in India to be lit up by electricity.

The market was designed by British architect William Emerson. The edifice is a blend of Norman and Flemish architectural styles. The friezes on the outside entrance depicting Indian farmers, and the stone fountains inside, were designed by Lockwood Kipling, father of novelist Rudyard Kipling. The market covers an area of 22,471sq m / 2,41,877sq ft, of which 5,515sq m / 59,363sq ft is occupied by the building itself. The structure was built using coarse buff coloured Kurla stone, with redstone from Bassein. It has a 15m high skylight awning designed to allow the sunlight brighten up the marketplace.

One can buy a variety of things in and around Crawford market. Some of them are: Ready-to-stitch clothes, dress material, Chinese toys, party products, artificial jewelry, travel bags, fruits and vegetables, shoes, belts and cake making and decorating equipment and toiletries. Also varieties of electrical light fittings and carpentry fittings are available. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahatma_Jyotiba_Phule_Mandai

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Nano

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Here are some more images from Dr “Google”:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=Crawford+Market+~+Mahatma+Jyotiba+Phule+Market&rlz=1C1GGRV_enNZ751NZ751&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi1zb2GsNfZAhVGvrwKHYlqBpwQ_AUICygC&biw=1536&bih=734

Posted by bruceontour 23:10 Archived in India

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