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How the locals love taking selfies

Time to start the afternoon tour.

This is what Reality Tours said …

Mumbai Sightseeing Tour

You decide where you want to go with this tour package! We do, however, have a suggested route if you would like our help.

Our route focuses on religion (so important to the lives of most Indians) and you learn about Hinduism, Islam and lesser known Jainism. Visually, this is an impressive tour- you will admire the Haji Ali in the middle of the sea, enjoy views from Mahalaxmi Temple, and get a one-of-a-kind perspective of Mumbai (and Marine Drive) from the Hanging Gardens. Dhobi Ghat, the world's largest open-air laundry, as well as the Gandi museum are also conveniently located en route.

All sights are in the Mahalaxmi/Malabar Hill area. Malabar Hill is a 15 minute drive from Colaba.

We generally use the same route on our Dharavi and Sightseeing Tour, so to save time and money you might want to do both on the same day (with a stop off for lunch.

This a private package tour and customized for you, so you can omit or add anything to the list. Or, if you prefer, we can do a completely different route, that's fine!

http://realitytoursandtravel.com/sightseeing-car.php

From the Bandra Worli Sea Link overlooking Mahim Bay.

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Haji Ali Dargah

When I was driven in Thursday night from the airport, I saw in the distance at the end of a long causeway what looked like a show ground / theme park with many coloured lights changing on the building and on a tower the lights as if it was spiralling downwards like a water park water slide. It turns out to be Haji Ali Dargah (Mosque and tomb).

For our next stop I had read that if it was high tide the water would cover the 500 metre / yards causeway. Luckily it wasn’t high tide but getting closer it was packed with people.

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The main attraction is not the mosque but the tomb. The Haji Ali Dargah is a popular pilgrimage site today and most tourists visit the tomb of Pir Haji Ali Shah Bukhari to seek his blessings for wealth, health, marriage etc.

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To me the main attraction was seeing the locals down at the end of the causeway taking selfies with the sea breaking over the rocks.

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The Haji Ali Dargah was constructed in 1431 in memory of a wealthy Muslim merchant, Sayyed Peer Haji Ali Shah Bukhari, who gave up all his worldly possessions before making a pilgrimage to Mecca. Hailing from Bukhara, in present-day Uzbekistan, Bukhari travelled around the world in the early to mid 15th century, and eventually settled in present-day Mumbai.

According to legends surrounding his life, once the saint saw a poor woman crying on the road, holding an empty vessel. He asked her what the problem was, she sobbed that her husband would thrash her as she stumbled and accidentally spilled the oil she was carrying. He asked her to take him to the spot where she spilt the oil. There, he jabbed a finger into the soil and the oil gushed out. The overjoyed woman filled up the vessel and went home.

Later, Pir Haji Ali Shah Bukhari had a recurring and disturbing dream that he had injured Earth by his act. Full of remorse and grief from that day he became very serious and was not keeping well. Then with the permission of his mother he traveled to India with his brother and finally reached the shore of Mumbai – near Worli or at some place opposite the present tomb. His brother went back to their native place. Pir Haji Ali Shah Bukhari sent a letter with him to their mother informing her that he was keeping good health and that he had decided to reside at that place permanently for the spread of Islam and that she should forgive him.

Till his death he kept spreading knowledge about Islam to the people and his devotees would regularly visit him. Before his death he advised his followers that they should not bury him at any proper place or graveyard and should drop his shroud ('kafan') in the ocean such that it should be buried by the people where it is found.

His wish was obeyed by his followers. That is why the Dargah Sharief is built at the very site where his shroud came to rest in the middle of the sea where it perched on a small mound of rocks rising above the sea. The Tomb and Dargah Sharief were built in the years to come.

On Thursdays and Fridays, the shrine is visited by an enormous number of pilgrims. Irrespective of faith and religion, people visit the dargah to get the blessings of the legendary saint. Sometimes, especially on Fridays, various Sufi musicians perform a form of devotional music called Qawwali at the dargah. Thanks Mr Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haji_Ali_Dargah

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About 10 - 15 thousand people visit the Dargah daily. The number of visitors increases to 20 - 30 thousand, on Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays.

http://www.hajialidargah.in/

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Posted by bruceontour 01:15 Archived in India

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